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Social Networks and Labour Market Transitions

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  • Bramoullé, Yann
  • Saint-Paul, Gilles

Abstract

We study the influence of social networks on labour market transitions. We develop the first model where social ties and job status co-evolve through time. Our key assumption is that the probability of formation of a new tie is greater between two employed individuals than between an employed and an unemployed individual. We show that this assumption generates negative duration dependence of exit rates from unemployment. Our model has a number of novel testable implications. For instance, we show that a higher connectivity among unemployed individuals reduces duration dependence and that exit rates depend positively on the duration of the last job held by the unemployed worker.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 4523.

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Date of creation: Aug 2004
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Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:4523

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Keywords: duration dependence; economic inbreeding; social capital; social networks; unemployment;

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References

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  1. Sergio Currarini & Paolo Pin & Matthew O. Jackson, 2007. "An Economic Model of Friendship: Homophily, Minorities and Segregation," Working Papers 2007_20, Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari".
  2. Daniel Cohen & Arnaud Lefranc & Gilles Saint-Paul, 1997. "French unemployment: a transatlantic perspective," Economic Policy, CEPR & CES & MSH, vol. 12(25), pages 265-292, October.
  3. Abbring, J.H. & Berg, G. van den & Ours, J.C. van, 2002. "The anatomy of unemployment dynamics," Open Access publications from Tilburg University urn:nbn:nl:ui:12-91479, Tilburg University.
  4. Antoni Calvó-Armengol & Matthew O. Jackson, 2004. "The Effects of Social Networks on Employment and Inequality," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(3), pages 426-454, June.
  5. van den Berg, Gerard J & van Ours, Jan C, 1996. "Unemployment Dynamics and Duration Dependence," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 14(1), pages 100-125, January.
  6. Arulampalam, Wiji & Booth, Alison L & Taylor, Mark P, 2000. "Unemployment Persistence," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 52(1), pages 24-50, January.
  7. Steiner, Viktor, 2001. " Unemployment Persistence in the West German Labour Market: Negative Duration Dependence or Sorting?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 63(1), pages 91-113, February.
  8. Heckman, James J & Borjas, George J, 1980. "Does Unemployment Cause Future Unemployment? Definitions, Questions and Answers from a Continuous Time Model of Heterogeneity and State Dependence," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 47(187), pages 247-83, August.
  9. Rosholm, M., 1999. "Observed and Unobserved Heterogeneity in the Duration Dependency Parameter," Papers 99-5, Aarhus School of Business - Department of Economics.
  10. Montgomery, James D, 1991. "Social Networks and Labor-Market Outcomes: Toward an Economic Analysis," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(5), pages 1407-18, December.
  11. Krauth, Brian V., 2004. "A dynamic model of job networking and social influences on employment," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 28(6), pages 1185-1204, March.
  12. Topa, Giorgio, 2001. "Social Interactions, Local Spillovers and Unemployment," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 68(2), pages 261-95, April.
  13. Berg, G. van den & Ours, J.C. van, 1996. "Unemployment dynamics and duration dependence," Open Access publications from Tilburg University urn:nbn:nl:ui:12-86874, Tilburg University.
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  1. Duncan Smith's daft idea
    by chris dillow in Stumbling and Mumbling on 2010-06-27 11:17:48
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Cited by:
  1. Francois Fontaine, 2004. "Why are similar workers paid differently? The role of social networks," 2004 Meeting Papers 493, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  2. Christophe Nordman & Laure Pasquier-Doumer, 2013. "Transitions in a West African Labour Market: The Role of Social Networks," Working Papers DT/2013/12, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).
  3. Marco Caliendo & Ricarda Schmidl & Arne Uhlendorff, 2010. "Social Networks, Job Search Methods and Reservation Wages: Evidence for Germany," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1055, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  4. Albrecht Glitz, 2013. "Coworker networks in the labour market," Economics Working Papers 1400, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
  5. Sebastian Buhai & Marco van der Leij, 2006. "A Social Network Analysis of Occupational Segregation," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 06-016/1, Tinbergen Institute, revised 08 Nov 2006.
  6. Federico Cingano & Alfonso Rosolia, 2012. "People I Know: Job Search and Social Networks," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 30(2), pages 291 - 332.
  7. Federico Cingano & Alfonso Rosolia, 2006. "People I Know: Workplace Networks and Job Search Outcomes," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 600, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  8. repec:ese:iserwp:2013-24 is not listed on IDEAS
  9. Fontaine, Francois, 2007. "A simple matching model with social networks," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 94(3), pages 396-401, March.
  10. Simon Gemkow & Michael Neugart, 2011. "Referral hiring, endogenous social networks, and inequality: an agent-based analysis," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 21(4), pages 703-719, October.

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