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Measuring Effects of Trade Policy Distortions: How Far Have We Come?

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  • Anderson, Kym

Abstract

After a brief review of the literature to the early 1970s, this Paper assesses the contributions by economists during the past three decades to measuring the distortionary effects of trade policies. It does not pretend to be a comprehensive survey, but draws on selections from the literature that give a sense of the distance the profession has traveled from a trade policy practitioner’s viewpoint since Corden’s first paper on the subject in 1957. Phenomenal though that progress has been, there is ample room for further improvement in computing the economic (and other) effects of trade-related policies and their reform. The Paper concludes with suggestions of where the priorities should be in global modeling of trade policy reform, as the world moves into the next round of multilateral trade negotiations.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 3579.

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Date of creation: Oct 2002
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Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:3579

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Keywords: cost of protection; effective protection; empirical modelling of effects of trade policies; trade policy distortions;

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Cited by:
  1. Maria Cipollina & Luca Salvatici, 2008. "Measuring Protection: Mission Impossible?," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 22(3), pages 577-616, 07.
  2. Toma, Luiza & Mathijs, Erik & Revoredo-Giha, Cesar, 2006. "Linkages between Agriculture, Trade and the Environment in the Context of the European Union Accession," Working Papers 45991, Scotland's Rural College (formerly Scottish Agricultural College), Land Economy & Environment Research Group.
  3. Anderson, Kym, 2005. "Setting the trade policy agenda : What roles for Economists?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3560, The World Bank.
  4. Touré, Ali A. & Groenewald, Jan & Seck, Papa Abdoulaye & Diagne, Aliou, 2013. "Analysing policy-induced effects on the performance of irrigated rice," African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, African Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 8(1), July.
  5. Thilo W. Glebe, 2005. "Welfare Economics of Trade Liberalisation and Strategic Environmental Policy," Discussion Papers 072005, Technische Universität München, Environmental Economics and Agricultural Policy Group, revised 2008.

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