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Crossing the Tracks? More on Trends in the Training of Male and Female Workers in Great Britain

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  • Melanie Jones

    ()
    (School of Business and Economics, Swansea University)

  • Paul Latreille

    ()
    (School of Business and Economics, Swansea University)

  • Peter Sloane

    ()
    (School of Business and Economics, Swansea University)

Abstract

A small number of recent empirical studies for several countries has reported the intriguing finding that the ‘advantage’ previously enjoyed by men in respect of training incidence and reported in earlier work in the literature has been reversed. The present paper explores the sources of the gender differential in training incidence using Labour Force Survey data, updating previous U.K. studies and providing further insights into the above phenomenon. The results suggest that the greater part of the ‘gap’ typically relates to differences in characteristics, among which the most important relate to occupation, industry and sector (public/private).

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by AIAS, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies in its series LoWER Working Papers with number wp9.

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Date of creation: Nov 2004
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Handle: RePEc:aia:lower3:wp9

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  1. Oaxaca, Ronald L. & Ransom, Michael R., 1994. "On discrimination and the decomposition of wage differentials," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 5-21, March.
  2. Shields, Michael A & Price, Stephen Wheatley, 1999. "Ethnic Differences in the Incidence and Determinants of Employer-Funded Training in Britain," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 46(5), pages 523-51, November.
  3. Green, Francis, 1993. "The Determinants of Training of Male and Female Employees in Britain," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 55(1), pages 103-22, February.
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