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Do study grants help refugees find jobs? A case study of the effects of the voluntary sector grants on the education, training and employment of refugees in the United Kingdom

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  • Peter Ilmolelian
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    Abstract

    Using the Africa Educational Trust (AET) as a case study, the primary aim of the research was to investigate whether or not the employment outcomes of those refugees who received financial grants to enable them attend their education/training courses were different from those who did not. 122 individuals who applied to AET for grants in 1993/94 were interviewed and data analysed using the Probit model and McNemar's Chi- squared test of significance. The study found that grant holders were more likely to successfully complete their courses than those who did not receive any grants and that there was a positive relationship between the level of study and the probability of later employment. Although the differences in subject area were not statistically significant, the results suggested that computing and IT studies were less likely to lead to employment than education/ social science and health studies.

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    File URL: http://128.118.178.162/eps/hew/papers/0501/0501004.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by EconWPA in its series HEW with number 0501004.

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    Length: 44 pages
    Date of creation: 09 Jan 2005
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwphe:0501004

    Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 44
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    Web page: http://128.118.178.162

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    Keywords: Asylum seekers; education; employment; refugees; training; UK;

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    1. Wiji Arulampalam & Alison L. Booth, 1997. "Who gets over the training hurdle? A study of the training experiences of young men and women in Britain," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 10(2), pages 197-217.
    2. Booth, Alison L, 1991. "Job-Related Formal Training: Who Receives It and What Is It Worth?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 53(3), pages 281-94, August.
    3. Anne B. Royalty, 1996. "The effects of job turnover on the training of men and women," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 49(3), pages 505-521, April.
    4. Rainer Winkelmann, 1996. "Employment prospects and skill acquisition of apprenticeship-trained workers in Germany," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 49(4), pages 658-672, July.
    5. Stark, Oded & Helmenstein, Christian & Yegorov, Yuri, 1997. "Migrants' Savings, Purchasing Power Parity, and the Optimal Duration of Migration," Economics Series 44, Institute for Advanced Studies.
    6. George J. Borjas, 1991. "National Origin and the Skills of Immigrants in the Postwar Period," NBER Working Papers 3575, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Greenhalgh, C. & Mavrotas, G., 1991. "Job Training, New Technology and Labour Turnover," Economics Series Working Papers 99121, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    8. Michael Shields & Stephen Wheatley Price, 1998. "The earnings of male immigrants in England: evidence from the quarterly LFS," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(9), pages 1157-1168.
    9. Barry R. Chiswick & Yinon Cohen & Tzippi Zach, 1997. "The labor market status of immigrants: Effects of the unemployment rate at arrival and duration of residence," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 50(2), pages 289-303, January.
    10. Fershtman, C. & Murphy, K.M., 1993. "Social Status, Education and Growth," Papers 8-93, Tel Aviv.
    11. Khan, Aliya Hashmi, 1997. "Post-migration investment in education by immigrants in the United States," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(Supplemen), pages 285-313.
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