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Food Safety Innovation In The United States: Evidence From The Meat Industry

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Author Info

  • Golan, Elise H.
  • Roberts, Tanya
  • Salay, Elisabete
  • Caswell, Julie A.
  • Ollinger, Michael
  • Moore, Danna L.

Abstract

Recent industry innovations improving the safety of the Nation's meat supply range from new pathogen tests, high-tech equipment, and supply chain management systems, to new surveillance networks. Despite these and other improvements, the market incentives that motivate private firms to invest in innovation seem to be fairly weak. Results from an ERS survey of U.S. meat and poultry slaughter and processing plants and two case studies of innovation in the U.S. beef industry reveal that the industry has developed a number of mechanisms to overcome that weakness and to stimulate investment in food safety innovation. Industry experience suggests that government policy can increase food safety innovation by reducing informational asymmetries and strengthening the ability of innovating firms to appropriate the benefits of their investments.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/34083
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service in its series Agricultural Economics Reports with number 34083.

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Date of creation: 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ags:uerser:34083

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Related research

Keywords: Food safety; innovation; meat; asymmetric information; Beef Steam Pasteurization System; Bacterial Pathogen Sampling and Testing Program; Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety; Livestock Production/Industries;

References

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  1. Peter Bogetoft & Henrik B. Olesen, 2000. "Incentives, Information Systems and Competition," CIE Discussion Papers 2000-12, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics. Centre for Industrial Economics.
  2. Jensen, Helen H. & Unnevehr, Laurian J., 1995. "Tracking Foodborne Pathogens from Farm to Table: Data Needs to Evaluate Control Options," Staff General Research Papers 1095, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  3. Ginger Zhe Jin & Phillip Leslie, 2003. "The Effect Of Information On Product Quality: Evidence From Restaurant Hygiene Grade Cards," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 118(2), pages 409-451, May.
  4. Golan, Elise H. & Kuchler, Fred & Mitchell, Lorraine, 2000. "Economics Of Food Labeling," Agricultural Economics Reports 34069, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  5. Neal H. Hooker & Rodolfo M. Nayga & John W. Siebert, 1999. "Preserving and Communicating Food Safety Gains," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 81(5), pages 1102-1106.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Ollinger, Michael & Moore, Danna L., 2009. "The Interplay of Regulation and Marketing Incentives in Providing Food Safety," Economic Research Report 55837, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  2. Anders, Sven & Caswell, Julie A., 2006. "Assessing the Impact of Stricter Food Safety Standards on Trade: HACCP in U.S. Seafood Trade with the Developing World," 2006 Annual meeting, July 23-26, Long Beach, CA 21338, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  3. Ollinger, Michael & Muth, Mary K. & Karns, Shawn A. & Choice, Zanethia, 2011. "Food Safety Audits, Plant Characteristics, and Food Safety Technology Use in Meat and Poultry Plants," Economic Information Bulletin 117989, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  4. Ollinger, Michael, 2009. "The Cost of Food Safety Technologies in the Meat and Poultry Industries," 2009 Annual Meeting, July 26-28, 2009, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 48783, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  5. Venturini, Luciano, 2006. "Vertical competition between manufacturers and retailers and upstream incentives to innovate and differentiate," 98th Seminar, June 29-July 2, 2006, Chania, Crete, Greece 10050, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  6. Ng, Desmond W. & Salin, Victoria, 2012. "An Institutional Approach to the Examination of Food Safety," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IAMA), vol. 15(2).
  7. William E. Nganje & Simeon Kaitibie & Alexander Sorin, 2007. "HACCP implementation and economic optimality in turkey processing," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 23(2), pages 211-228.
  8. Onyango, Benjamin M. & Hooker, Neal H. & Hallman, William K. & Cuite, Cara L., 2010. "Americans’ Perceptions of Food Safety: A Comparative Study of Fresh Produce, Beef and Poultry Products," Journal of Food Distribution Research, Food Distribution Research Society, vol. 41(3), November.
  9. Ng, Desmond W. & Salin, Victoria, 2012. "An Institutional Approach to the Examination of Food Safety," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IAMA), vol. 15(2).

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