Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

The effects of an incentive program on quality of care in diabetes management

Contents:

Author Info

  • Anthony Scott

    (University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, Melbourne, Vic., Australia)

  • Stefanie Schurer

    (University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, Melbourne, Vic., Australia)

  • Paul H. Jensen

    (University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, Melbourne, Vic., Australia)

  • Peter Sivey

    (University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, Melbourne, Vic., Australia)

Abstract

An incentive program for general practitioners to encourage systematic and igh-quality care in chronic disease management was introduced in Australia in 1999. There is little empirical evidence and ambiguous theoretical guidance on which effects to expect. This paper evaluates the impact of the incentive program on quality of care in diabetes, as measured by the probability of ordering an HbA1c test. The empirical analysis is conducted with a unique data set and a bivariate probit model to control for the self-selection process of practices into the program. The study finds that the incentive program increased the probability of an HbA1c test being ordered by 20 percentage points and that participation in the program is facilitated by the support of Divisions of General Practice. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/hec.1536
File Function: Link to full text; subscription required
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Health Economics.

Volume (Year): 18 (2009)
Issue (Month): 9 ()
Pages: 1091-1108

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:18:y:2009:i:9:p:1091-1108

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5749

Related research

Keywords:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Heckman, James J, 1978. "Dummy Endogenous Variables in a Simultaneous Equation System," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(4), pages 931-59, July.
  2. Patrick Francois & Michael Vlassopoulos, 2008. "Pro-social Motivation and the Delivery of Social Services," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 54(1), pages 22-54, March.
  3. Scott, Anthony & Shiell, Alan, 1997. "Do fee descriptors influence treatment choices in general practice? A multilevel discrete choice model," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 323-342, June.
  4. Udo Schneider & Volker Ulrich, 2005. "The Physician-Patient Relationship Revisited - the Patient's View," HEW 0505001, EconWPA.
  5. Hugh Gravelle & Matt Sutton & Ada Ma, 2008. "Doctor Behaviour Under a Pay for Performance Contract: Further Evidence from the Quality and Outcomes Framework," Working Papers 034cherp, Centre for Health Economics, University of York.
  6. Zhang, Xiaohui & Zhao, Xueyan & Harris, Anthony, 2009. "Chronic diseases and labour force participation in Australia," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 91-108, January.
  7. Wilde, Joachim, 2000. "Identification of multiple equation probit models with endogenous dummy regressors," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 69(3), pages 309-312, December.
  8. Atella, Vincenzo & Deb, Partha, 2008. "Are primary care physicians, public and private sector specialists substitutes or complements? Evidence from a simultaneous equations model for count data," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 770-785, May.
  9. Manski, Charles F, 1993. "Identification of Endogenous Social Effects: The Reflection Problem," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 60(3), pages 531-42, July.
  10. Etienne Dumont & Bernard Fortin & Nicolas Jacquemet & Bruce S. Shearer, 2008. "Physicians’ Multitasking and Incentives: Empirical Evidence from a Natural Experiment," CIRANO Working Papers 2008s-20, CIRANO.
  11. Rashad, Inas & Kaestner, Robert, 2004. "Teenage sex, drugs and alcohol use: problems identifying the cause of risky behaviors," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 493-503, May.
  12. repec:hal:cesptp:halshs-00305308 is not listed on IDEAS
  13. Chiara Monfardini & Rosalba Radice, 2008. "Testing Exogeneity in the Bivariate Probit Model: A Monte Carlo Study," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 70(2), pages 271-282, 04.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Mark Dusheiko & Hugh Gravelle & Stephen Martin & Nigel Rice & Peter Smith, . "Does better disease management in primary care reduce hospital costs? Evidence from English primary care," Discussion Papers 11/15, Department of Economics, University of York.
  2. Fiorentini, Gianluca & Lippi Bruni, Matteo & Ugolini, Cristina, 2013. "GPs and hospital expenditures. Should we keep expenditure containment programs alive?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 10-20.
  3. Mark Dusheiko & Hugh Gravelle & Stephen Martin & Nigel Rice & Peter C Smith, 2011. "Does Better Disease Management in Primary Care Reduce Hospital Costs?," Working Papers 065cherp, Centre for Health Economics, University of York.
  4. E. Iezzi & M. Lippi Bruni & C. Ugolini, 2011. "The role of GP’s compensation schemes in diabetes care: evidence from panel data," Working Papers wp766, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
  5. Jeannette Brosig-Koch & Heike Hennig-Schmidt & Nadja Kairies & Daniel Wiesen, 2013. "How Effective are Pay-for-Performance Incentives for Physicians? – A Laboratory Experiment," Ruhr Economic Papers 0413, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
  6. Nolan, Anne & O'Reilly, Jacqueline & Smith, Samantha & Brick, Aoife, 2011. "The Potential Role of Pay-for-Performance in Irish Health Care," Papers EC4, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
  7. Lana Friesen & Lata Gangadharan, 2011. "Designing Self-Reporting Regimes to Encourage Truth Telling: An Experimental Study," Discussion Papers Series 426, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:18:y:2009:i:9:p:1091-1108. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.