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Expenditure dispersion and dietary quality: evidence from Canada

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  • Timothy K. M. Beatty

    (Department of Economics, University of York, Heslington, York, UK)

Abstract

This paper examines links between the way in which a household spreads their food expenditure over time and the dietary quality of the food they purchase. I find that households who make more frequent, smaller food purchases buy healthier foods than households who make fewer, larger purchases. These households are more likely to purchase foods with a lower share of total calories from fats, saturated fats and a larger share of calories from fruits and vegetables. The analysis is extended using quantile regression. The effect of expenditure dispersion is found to be largest among households with poor diets i.e. those households with diets high in saturated fats and low in fruits and vegetables. Copyright © 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/hec.1393
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Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Health Economics.

Volume (Year): 17 (2008)
Issue (Month): 9 ()
Pages: 1001-1014

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Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:17:y:2008:i:9:p:1001-1014

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Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5749

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  1. Kaufman, Phillip R. & MacDonald, James M. & Lutz, Steve M. & Smallwood, David M., 1997. "Do the Poor Pay More for Food? Item Selection and Price Differences Affect Low-Income Household Food Costs," Agricultural Economics Reports, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service 34065, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  2. Roger Koenker & Kevin F. Hallock, 2001. "Quantile Regression," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 15(4), pages 143-156, Fall.
  3. Peter M. Feather, 2003. "Valuing Food Store Access: Policy Implications for the Food Stamp Program," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 85(1), pages 162-172.
  4. L. Wade, 1988. "Review," Public Choice, Springer, Springer, vol. 58(1), pages 99-100, July.
  5. Preston, Ian & Laisney, François & Crawford, Ian A., 2002. "Estimation of Household Demand Systems with Theoretically Compatible Engel Curves and Unit Value Specifications," ZEW Discussion Papers, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research 97-06 [rev.], ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  6. Bhattacharya, Jayanta & Currie, Janet & Haider, Steven, 2004. "Poverty, food insecurity, and nutritional outcomes in children and adults," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 839-862, July.
  7. Adesoji O. Adelaja & Rodolfo M. Nayga & Tara C. Lauderbach, 1997. "Income and Racial Differentials in Selected Nutrient Intakes," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 79(5), pages 1452-1460.
  8. Kellie Curry Raper & Maria Namakhoye Wanzala & Rodolfo Nayga, 2002. "Food expenditures and household demographic composition in the US: a demand systems approach," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(8), pages 981-992.
  9. Jayachandran N. Variyam & James Blaylock & David Smallwood, 2002. "Characterizing the Distribution of Macronutrient Intake among U.S. Adults: A Quantile Regression Approach," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 84(2), pages 454-466.
  10. Naeem Ahmed & Matthew Brzozowski & Thomas Crossley, 2006. "Measurement errors in recall food consumption data," IFS Working Papers, Institute for Fiscal Studies W06/21, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
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