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Characterizing the Distribution of Macronutrient Intake among U.S. Adults: A Quantile Regression Approach

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  • Jayachandran N. Variyam
  • James Blaylock
  • David Smallwood
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    Abstract

    Since the risk of dietary inadequacy or excess is greater at the tails of the nutrient intake distributions than at the mean, marginal effects of explanatory variables estimated at the conditional mean using ordinary least squares may be of limited value in characterizing these distributions. Quantile regression is effective in this situation since it can estimate conditional functions at any part of the distribution. Quantile regression results suggest that age, education, and income have a larger influence at intake levels where the risk of excess is greater compared with intake levels where the risk of excess is lower. Copyright 2002, Oxford University Press.

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/1467-8276.00310
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Agricultural and Applied Economics Association in its journal American Journal of Agricultural Economics.

    Volume (Year): 84 (2002)
    Issue (Month): 2 ()
    Pages: 454-466

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    Handle: RePEc:oup:ajagec:v:84:y:2002:i:2:p:454-466

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    Cited by:
    1. Drescher, Larissa S. & Goddard, Ellen W., 2011. "Heterogeneous Demand for Food Diversity: A Quantile Regression Analysis," 51st Annual Conference, Halle, Germany, September 28-30, 2011 114484, German Association of Agricultural Economists (GEWISOLA).
    2. Salois, Matthew & Tiffin, Richard & Balcombe, Kelvin, 2010. "Calorie and Nutrient Consumption as a Function of Income: A Cross-Country Analysis," MPRA Paper 24726, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Abdulai, Awudu & Aubert, Dominique, 2004. "A cross-section analysis of household demand for food and nutrients in Tanzania," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 31(1), pages 67-79, July.
    4. Mahadevan, Renuka & Suardi, Sandy, 2013. "Is there a role for caste and religion in food security policy? A look at rural India," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 58-69.
    5. Gustavsen, Geir Waehler & Rickertsen, Kyrre, 2004. "For Whom Reduced Prices Count: A Censored Quantile Regression Analysis Of Vegetable Demand," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 20172, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    6. Herzfeld, Thomas & Huffman, Sonya K. & Rizov, Marian, 2009. "The Dynamics of the Russian Lifestyle During Transition: Changes in Food, Alcohol and Cigarette Consumption," Staff General Research Papers 13116, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    7. Meng, Ting & Florkowski, Wojciech J. & Sarpong, Daniel Bruce & Resurreccion, Anna V.A. & Chinnan, Manjeet S., 2013. "The Determinants of Food Expenditures in the Urban Households of Ghana: A Quantile Regression Approach," 2013 Annual Meeting, February 2-5, 2013, Orlando, Florida 143033, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    8. Timothy K.M. Beatty, 2007. "Expenditure Dispersion and Dietary Quality: Evidence from Canada," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 07/13, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    9. Hennings, Enrique & Katchova, Ani L., 2005. "Business Growth Strategies Of Illinois Farms: A Quantile Regression Approach," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI 19367, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    10. Srinivasan, C.S., 2013. "Can adherence to dietary guidelines address excess caloric intake? An empirical assessment for the UK," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 11(4), pages 574-591.
    11. Zepeda, Lydia & Li, Jinghan, 2006. "Who Buys Local Food?," Journal of Food Distribution Research, Food Distribution Research Society, vol. 37(03), November.
    12. Gustavsen, Geir Waehler, 2005. "Public Policies and the Demand for Carbonated Soft Drinks: A Censored Quantile Regression Approach," 2005 International Congress, August 23-27, 2005, Copenhagen, Denmark 24737, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    13. Srinivasan, Chittur S., 2011. "Healthier Eating And Rising Obesity In The Uk: Explaining The Paradox," 85th Annual Conference, April 18-20, 2011, Warwick University, Coventry, UK 108787, Agricultural Economics Society.

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