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Providing Employers with Incentives to Train Low-SkilledWorkers: Evidence from the UK Employer Training Pilots

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Author Info

  • Laura Abramovsky
  • Erich Battistin
  • Emla Fitzsimons
  • Alissa Goodman
  • Helen Simpson

Abstract

We use unique workplace and employee-level data to evaluate a majorUK government pilot program to increase qualification-based, employer-providedtraining for low-qualified employees. We evaluate the program'seffect using a difference-in-differences approach. Using data on eligibleemployers and workers we find no evidence of a statistically significanteffect on the take-up of training in the first 3 years of the program.Our results suggest that the program involved a high level of deadweightand that improving the additionality of the subsequent national programis crucial if it is to make a significant contribution toward governmenttargets to increase qualification levels. (c) 2011 by The University of Chicago. Allrights reserved..

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Labor Economics.

Volume (Year): 29 (2011)
Issue (Month): 1 (01)
Pages: 153-193

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:29:y:2010:i:1:p:153-193

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Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JOLE/

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Cited by:
  1. Brunello, Giorgio & Comi, Simona, 2013. "The Side Effect of Pension Reforms on Training: Evidence from Italy," IZA Discussion Papers 7755, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Singer, Christine & Toomet, Ott-Siim, 2013. "On government-subsidized training programs for older workers," IAB Discussion Paper 201321, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
  3. Christos Bilanakos & Colin P. Green & John S. Heywood & Nikolaos Theodoropoulos, 2014. "Do Dominant Firms Provide More Training?," University of Cyprus Working Papers in Economics 06-2014, University of Cyprus Department of Economics.

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