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Temperature and the Allocation of Time: Implications for Climate Change

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  • Joshua Graff Zivin
  • Matthew Neidell

Abstract

We estimate the impacts of temperature on time allocation by exploiting plausibly exogenous variation in temperature over time within counties. Temperature increases at the higher end of the distribution reduce hours worked in industries with high exposure to climate and reduce time allocated to outdoor leisure for the nonemployed, with this time reallocated to indoor leisure. At the lower end of the distribution, time allocated to labor is nonresponsive to temperature increases, but outdoor leisure increases while indoor leisure decreases as temperature warms. We also find suggestive evidence of short-run adaptation to higher temperatures through temporal substitutions and acclimatization.

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File URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdfplus/10.1086/671766
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File URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/full/10.1086/671766
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Labor Economics.

Volume (Year): 32 (2014)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 1 - 26

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:doi:10.1086/671766

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Cited by:
  1. Stefano Bosi & David Desmarchelier & Lionel Ragot, 2013. "Pollution effects on labor supply and growth," CEEES Paper Series CE3S-05/13, European University at St. Petersburg, Department of Economics.
  2. Geoffrey Heal & Jisung Park, 2013. "Feeling the Heat: Temperature, Physiology & the Wealth of Nations," NBER Working Papers 19725, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Joshua S. Graff Zivin & Matthew J. Neidell, 2011. "The Impact of Pollution on Worker Productivity," NBER Working Papers 17004, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Albouy, David & Graf, Walter & Kellogg, Ryan & Wolff, Hendrik, 2013. "Climate Amenities, Climate Change, and American Quality of Life," IZA Discussion Papers 7339, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Jonathan Colmer, 2013. "Climate Variability, Child Labour and Schooling: Evidence on the Intensive and Extensive Margin," Working Papers 2013.81, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
  6. Tom Chang & Joshua S. Graff Zivin & Tal Gross & Matthew J. Neidell, 2014. "Particulate Pollution and the Productivity of Pear Packers," NBER Working Papers 19944, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Gordon H. Hanson, 2010. "Why Isn't Mexico Rich?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 48(4), pages 987-1004, December.
  8. Salvador Barrios & J. Nicolás Ibañez Rivas, 2014. "Climate Amenities and Adaptation to Climate Change: A Hedonic-Travel Cost Approach for Europe," Working Papers 2014.20, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
  9. Elshennawy, Abeer & Robinson, Sherman & Willenbockel, Dirk, 2013. "Climate Change and Economic Growth: An Intertemporal General Equilibrium Analysis for Egypt," MPRA Paper 47703, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  10. Karen Fisher-Vanden & Ian Sue Wing & Elisa Lanzi & David Popp, 2013. "Modeling climate change feedbacks and adaptation responses: recent approaches and shortcomings," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 117(3), pages 481-495, April.
  11. Ian Wing & Karen Fisher-Vanden, 2013. "Confronting the challenge of integrated assessment of climate adaptation: a conceptual framework," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 117(3), pages 497-514, April.
  12. Jonathan Colmer, 2013. "Climate Variability, Child Labour and Schooling: Evidence on the Intensive and Extensive Margin," Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment Working Papers 132, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
  13. David Albouy & Walter Graf & Ryan Kellogg & Hendrik Wolff, 2010. "Aversion to Extreme Temperatures, Climate Change, and Quality of Life," Working Papers UWEC-2011-03, University of Washington, Department of Economics.

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