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Caste Dominance and Economic Performance in Rural India

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  • Vegard Iversen
  • Adriaan Kalwij
  • Arjan Verschoor
  • Amaresh Dubey

Abstract

Using household panel data for rural India covering 1993–94 and 2004–5, we test whether scheduled castes (SCs) and other minority groups perform better or worse in terms of income when resident in villages dominated by (i) upper castes or (ii) their own group. Theoretically, upper-caste dominance comprises a potential “proximity gain” and offsetting group-specific “oppression” effects. For SCs and other backward classes (OBCs), initial proximity gains dominate negative oppression effects because upper-caste-dominated villages are located in more productive areas: once agroecology is controlled for, proximity and oppression effects cancel each other out. Although the effects are theoretically ambiguous, we find large, positive own-dominance or enclave effects for upper castes, OBCs, and especially SCs. These village regime effects are restricted to the Hindu social groups. Combining pathway and income source analysis, we close in on the mechanisms underpinning identity-based income disparities; while education matters, landownership accounts for most enclave effects. A strong postreform SC own-village advantage turns out to have agricultural rather than nonfarm or business origins. We also find upper-caste dominance to inhibit the educational progress of other social groups, along with negative enclave effects on the educational progress of Muslim women and scheduled tribe men.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Economic Development and Cultural Change.

Volume (Year): 62 (2014)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 423 - 457

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:ecdecc:doi:10.1086/675388

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Cited by:
  1. Gang, Ira N. & Sen, Kunal & Yun, Myeong-Su, 2012. "Is Caste Destiny? Occupational Diversification among Dalits in Rural India," IZA Discussion Papers 6295, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Mahadevan, Renuka & Suardi, Sandy, 2013. "Is there a role for caste and religion in food security policy? A look at rural India," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 58-69.

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