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Gender, Competitiveness, and Socialization at a Young Age: Evidence From a Matrilineal and a Patriarchal Society

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Author Info

  • Steffen Andersen

    (Copenhagen Business School)

  • Seda Ertac

    (Koc University)

  • Uri Gneezy

    (University of California, San Diego)

  • John A. List

    (University of Chicago)

  • Sandra Maximiano

    (Krannert School of Management)

Abstract

Recent literature presents evidence that men are more competitively inclined than women. Since top-level careers usually require competitiveness, competitiveness differences provide an explanation for gender gaps in wages and differences in occupational choice. A natural question is whether women are born less competitive or whether they become so through the process of socialization. To pinpoint when in the socialization process the difference arises, we compare the competitiveness of children in matrilineal and patriarchal societies. We find that while there is no difference at any age in the matrilineal society, girls become less competitive around puberty in the patriarchal society. © 2013 The President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by MIT Press in its journal Review of Economics and Statistics.

Volume (Year): 95 (2013)
Issue (Month): 4 (October)
Pages: 1438-1443

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Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:95:y:2013:i:4:p:1438-1443

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Web page: http://mitpress.mit.edu/journals/

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Related research

Keywords: gender; competitiveness; socialization; children; matrilineal society; patriarchal society;

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Cited by:
  1. Utteeyo Dasgupta & Lata Gangadharan & Pushkar Maitra & Subha Mani & Samyukta Subramanian, 2012. "Choosing to be Trained: Evidence from a Field Experiment," Development Research Unit Working Paper Series 43-12, Monash University, Department of Economics.
  2. Pushkar Maitra & Subha Mani, 2012. "Learning and Earning: Evidence from a Randomized Evaluation in India," Development Research Unit Working Paper Series 44-12, Monash University, Department of Economics.
  3. Ernesto Reuben & Matthew Wiswall & Basit Zafar, 2013. "Preferences and biases in educational choices and labor market expectations: shrinking the black box of gender," Staff Reports 627, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  4. Kirsten Häger & Bastiaan Oud & Daniel Schunk, 2012. "Egalitarian Envy: Cross-cultural Variation in the Development of Envy in Children," Jena Economic Research Papers 2012-059, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Max-Planck-Institute of Economics.
  5. Louis-Philippe Morin, 2013. "Do Men and Women Respond Differently to Competition? Evidence from a Major Education Reform," Working Papers E1305E, University of Ottawa, Department of Economics.
  6. Sugato Chakravarty & S. M. Zahid Iqbal & Abu Zafar M. Shahriar, 2013. "Are Women “Naturally” Better Credit Risks in Microcredit? Evidence from Field Experiments in Patriarchal and Matrilineal Societies in Bangladesh," Working Papers 1019, Purdue University, Department of Consumer Sciences.
  7. Säve Söderberg, Jenny & Sjögren Lindquist, Gabriella, 2014. "Children do not behave like adults: Gender gaps in performance and risk taking," Working Paper Series 7/2013, Swedish Institute for Social Research.
  8. Sule Alan & Nazli Baydar & Teodora Boneva & Thomas F. Crossley & Seda Ertac, 2013. "Parental Socialization Effort and the Intergenerational Transmission of Risk Preferences," Koç University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum Working Papers 1313, Koc University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum.
  9. Dasgupta, Utteeyo & Gangadharan, Lata & Maitra, Pushkar & Mani, Subha & Subramanian, Samyukta, 2011. "Selection into skill accumulation: evidence using observational and experimental data," MPRA Paper 32383, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  10. Jenny Säve-Söderbergh & Gabriella Sjögren Lindquist, 2014. "Children Do Not Behave Like Adults: Gender Gaps in Performance and Risk Taking within a Random Social Context in the High-StakesGame Shows Jeopardy and Junior Jeopardy," CESifo Working Paper Series 4595, CESifo Group Munich.

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