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Public Service Broadcasting of Sport, Shows, and News to Mitigate Rational Ignorance

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  • Julia Rothbauer
  • Gernot Sieg

Abstract

Rational individuals may use a tax or license-fee financed public service TV channel to mitigate the paradox of rational ignorance. The approach presented in this article assumes that increased consumption of information by voters improves democratic decisions, but marginal returns decrease. Depending on how fast marginal returns decrease, the public service TV channel broadcasts either only (unbiased serious) news or, to induce voters to watch the informational content, sports and shows (entertainment) as well.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1080/08997764.2012.755985
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Journal of Media Economics.

Volume (Year): 26 (2013)
Issue (Month): 1 (March)
Pages: 21-40

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Handle: RePEc:taf:jmedec:v:26:y:2013:i:1:p:21-40

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Cited by:
  1. Rothbauer, Julia & Sieg, Gernot, 2011. "Welfare effects of public service broadcasting in a free-to-air TV market," MPRA Paper 33779, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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