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The Political Economy of Mass Media

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  • Prat, Andrea
  • Strömberg, David

Abstract

We review the burgeoning political economy literature on the influence of mass media on politics and policy. This survey, which covers both theory and empirics, is organized along four main themes: transparency, capture, informative coverage, and ideological bias. We distill some general lessons and identify some open questions.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 8246.

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Date of creation: Feb 2011
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Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:8246

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Keywords: mass media; political economy;

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References

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