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Gender Differentials in Returns to Education in Spain

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Author Info

  • Maria Arrazola
  • Jose de Hevia

Abstract

In this article, rates of return to education for men and women have been estimated for the Spanish case, controlling for the biases appearing in the least squares estimation of the basic Mincerian equation. The results show that the returns for women are greater than those for men. The gender differential increases when taking into account the endogeneity of the education and the selection bias, and appears to be specially important for vocational and university studies. The results are consistent with the evolution of the demand for education in Spain in the past two decades.

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File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/09645290600854151
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Education Economics.

Volume (Year): 14 (2006)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 469-486

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Handle: RePEc:taf:edecon:v:14:y:2006:i:4:p:469-486

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Related research

Keywords: Rate of return; demand for schooling;

References

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  1. Ichino, Andrea & Winter-Ebmer, Rudolf, 1999. "Lower and upper bounds of returns to schooling: An exercise in IV estimation with different instruments," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(4-6), pages 889-901, April.
  2. Pedro Telhado Pereira & Pedro Silva Martins, 2004. "Returns to education and wage equations," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(6), pages 525-531.
  3. Andrea Ichino & Rudolf Winter-Ebmer, 2004. "The Long-Run Educational Cost of World War II," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 22(1), pages 57-86, January.
  4. Elchanan Cohn & John Addison, 1998. "The Economic Returns to Lifelong Learning in OECD Countries," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(3), pages 253-307.
  5. M. Arrazola & J. De Hevia & M. Risueno & J. F. Sanz, 2003. "Returns to education in Spain: Some evidence on the endogeneity of schooling," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(3), pages 293-304.
  6. Uusitalo, Roope, 1999. "Return to education in Finland," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(4), pages 569-580, November.
  7. Card, David, 2001. "Estimating the Return to Schooling: Progress on Some Persistent Econometric Problems," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 69(5), pages 1127-60, September.
  8. Ezequiel Uriel Jiménez & Pilar Beneito López & Javier Ferri & María Luisa Moltó Carbonell, 1995. "Determinantes De La Demanda De La Vivienda En España," Working Papers. Serie EC 1995-12, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
  9. Harmon, Colm & Walker, Ian, 1995. "Estimates of the Economic Return to Schooling for the United Kingdom," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(5), pages 1278-86, December.
  10. Behrman, Jere R & Deolalikar, Anil B, 1995. "Are There Differential Returns to Schooling by Gender? The Case of Indonesian Labour Markets," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 57(1), pages 97-117, February.
  11. J.D. Angrist & Guido W. Imbens & D.B. Rubin, 1993. "Identification of Causal Effects Using Instrumental Variables," NBER Technical Working Papers 0136, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Arrazola, María & de Hevia, José, 2008. "Three measures of returns to education: An illustration for the case of Spain," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 266-275, June.
  2. Murillo, Inés P. & Rahona-López, Marta & Salinas-Jiménez, Maria del Mar, 2012. "Effects of educational mismatch on private returns to education: An analysis of the Spanish case (1995–2006)," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 34(5), pages 646-659.
  3. LILLO, Adelaida & CASADO-DÍAZ, José M., 2010. "On The Rewards To Education In Spain: Endogeneity And Regional Differences," Regional and Sectoral Economic Studies, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 10(3).
  4. Marta Rahona López & Inés P. Murillo Huertas & María del Mar Salinas Jiménez, 2010. "Incidencia del desajuste educativo en el rendimiento privado de la educación en España," Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación volume 5, in: María Jesús Mancebón-Torrubia & Domingo P. Ximénez-de-Embún & José María Gómez-Sancho & Greg (ed.), Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación 5, edition 1, volume 5, chapter 13, pages 267-284 Asociación de Economía de la Educación.
  5. Olaf J. de Groot & Tilman Brück & Carlos Bozzoli, 2009. "How Many Bucks in a Bang: On the Estimation of the Economic Costs of Conflict," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 948, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.

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