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Was Hercules Happy? Some Answers from a Functional Model of Human Well-being

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Author Info

  • Joar Vittersø

    ()

  • Yngvil Søholt
  • Audun Hetland
  • Irina Thoresen
  • Espen Røysamb
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    Abstract

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11205-009-9447-4
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Springer in its journal Social Indicators Research.

    Volume (Year): 95 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 1 (January)
    Pages: 1-18

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    Handle: RePEc:spr:soinre:v:95:y:2010:i:1:p:1-18

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    Web page: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/11135

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    Related research

    Keywords: Life satisfaction; Personal growth; Pleasure; Interest; Challenge; Functional well-being;

    References

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    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
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    1. Daniel Haybron, 2000. "Two Philosophical Problems in the Study of Happiness," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 1(2), pages 207-225, June.
    2. Bruce Headey, 2008. "Life Goals Matter to Happiness: A Revision of Set-Point Theory," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 86(2), pages 213-231, April.
    3. Carol Ryff & Burton Singer, 2008. "Know Thyself and Become What You Are: A Eudaimonic Approach to Psychological Well-Being," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 13-39, January.
    4. Richard M. Ryan & Veronika Huta & Edward Deci, 2008. "Living well: a self-determination theory perspective on eudaimonia," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 139-170, January.
    5. Joar Vittersø & Hella Oelmann & Anita Wang, 2009. "Life Satisfaction is not a Balanced Estimator of the Good Life: Evidence from Reaction Time Measures and Self-Reported Emotions," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 10(1), pages 1-17, March.
    6. Joar Vittersø, 2004. "Subjective Well-Being versus Self-Actualization: Using the Flow-Simplex to Promote a Conceptual Clarification of Subjective Quality of Life," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 65(3), pages 299-331, February.
    7. Edward Deci & Richard Ryan, 2008. "Hedonia, eudaimonia, and well-being: an introduction," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 1-11, January.
    8. Ed Diener & Carol Nickerson & Richard Lucas & Ed Sandvik, 2002. "Dispositional Affect and Job Outcomes," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 59(3), pages 229-259, September.
    9. Richard E. Lucas & Andrew E. Clark, 2005. "Do people really adapt to marriage?," PSE Working Papers halshs-00590574, HAL.
    10. Ulrich Schimmack & Jürgen Schupp & Gert Wagner, 2008. "The Influence of Environment and Personality on the Affective and Cognitive Component of Subjective Well-being," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 89(1), pages 41-60, October.
    11. Ed Diener, 1994. "Assessing subjective well-being: Progress and opportunities," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 31(2), pages 103-157, February.
    12. Daniel Kahneman & Alan B. Krueger, 2006. "Developments in the Measurement of Subjective Well-Being," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 20(1), pages 3-24, Winter.
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    Cited by:
    1. Helga Løvoll & Joar Vittersø, 2014. "Can Balance be Boring? A Critique of the “Challenges Should Match Skills” Hypotheses in Flow Theory," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 115(1), pages 117-136, January.

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