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Innovativeness and Subjective Well-Being

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  • Martin Binder

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Abstract

What are the effects of innovativeness on well-being? This paper argues that research on subjective well-being has progressed to a point where measures of subjective well-being (or: happiness) can usefully be employed to assess the welfare effects of innovative change. Based on a discussion of the prospects and pitfalls associated with subjective well-being as welfare measure and benchmark of societal progress, an argument is put forward as to why these measures are particularly well-suited in the context of innovative change. Empirically well-founded and with an explicit dynamic foundation, theories of subjective well-being allow for a nuanced and comprehensive assessment of the effects that innovativeness has on a society. Two evaluation rules, the “life domain evaluation principle” and the “welfare dynamics principle” are suggested to guide such normative assessment. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2013

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Social Indicators Research.

Volume (Year): 111 (2013)
Issue (Month): 2 (April)
Pages: 561-578

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Handle: RePEc:spr:soinre:v:111:y:2013:i:2:p:561-578

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Web page: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/11135

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Keywords: Subjective well-being; Innovations; Public policy; Happiness;

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Cited by:
  1. Martin Binder & Leonhard K. Lades, 2013. "Autonomy-enhancing paternalism," Papers on Economics and Evolution 2013-04, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.
  2. Karol Jan BOROWIECKI, 2014. "How Are You, My Dearest Mozart? Well-being and Creativity of Three Famous Composers Based on their Letters," Trinity Economics Papers tep0114, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
  3. Martin Binder, 2013. "Subjective Well-being Capabilities: Bridging the Gap between the Capability Approach and Subjective Well-Being Research," Papers on Economics and Evolution 2013-02, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.

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