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Changes in the earnings of Arab men in the US between 2000 and 2002

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  • Alberto Dávila

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  • Marie Mora

    ()

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s00148-005-0050-y
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Population Economics.

    Volume (Year): 18 (2005)
    Issue (Month): 4 (November)
    Pages: 587-601

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    Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:18:y:2005:i:4:p:587-601

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    Related research

    Keywords: Arab Americans; September 11th; discrimination; J71; J31; J23;

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    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
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    1. Phelps, Edmund S, 1972. "The Statistical Theory of Racism and Sexism," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 62(4), pages 659-61, September.
    2. Blau, Francine D & Kahn, Lawrence M, 1994. "Rising Wage Inequality and the U.S. Gender Gap," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(2), pages 23-28, May.
    3. Roger Koenker & Kevin F. Hallock, 2001. "Quantile Regression," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 15(4), pages 143-156, Fall.
    4. Juhn, Chinhui & Murphy, Kevin M & Pierce, Brooks, 1993. "Wage Inequality and the Rise in Returns to Skill," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(3), pages 410-42, June.
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    Cited by:
    1. Simone Schüller, 2013. "The Effects of 9/11 on Attitudes toward Immigration and the Moderating Role of Education," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 534, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    2. García Muñoz, Teresa & Neuman, Shoshana, 2012. "Is Religiosity of Immigrants a Bridge or a Buffer in the Process of Integration? A Comparative Study of Europe and the United States," IZA Discussion Papers 6384, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Thomas Cornelissen & Uwe Jirjahn, 2010. "September 11th and the Earnings of Muslims in Germany - The Moderating Role of Education and Firm Size," Research Papers in Economics 2010-02, University of Trier, Department of Economics.
    4. Adida, Claire L. & Laitin, David D. & Valfort, Marie-Anne, 2011. ""One Muslim is Enough!" - Evidence from a Field Experiment in France," IZA Discussion Papers 6122, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Sami Miaari & Asaf Zussman & Noam Zussman, 2012. "Ethnic conflict and job separations," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 25(2), pages 419-437, January.
    6. Shannon, Michael, 2012. "Did the September 11th attacks affect the Canadian labour market?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 115(1), pages 91-93.
    7. Claire L. Adida & David D. Laitin & Marie-Anne Valfort, 2014. "Muslims in France: identifying a discriminatory equilibrium," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-00977076, HAL.
    8. Johnston, David W. & Lordan, Grace, 2012. "Discrimination makes me sick! An examination of the discrimination–health relationship," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 99-111.
    9. Goel, Deepti, 2009. "Perceptions and Labor Market Outcomes of Immigrants in Australia after 9/11," IZA Discussion Papers 4356, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Faisal Rabby & William Rodgers, 2011. "Post 9-11 U.S. Muslim Labor Market Outcomes," Atlantic Economic Journal, International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 39(3), pages 273-289, September.

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