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Metropolitan/non-metropolitan divergence: A spatial Markov chain approach

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  • George Hammond

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Abstract

This article examines spatial aspects of distributional dynamics and finds that the distribution of US metropolitan incomes relative to their neighbours has diverged during the 1969-1999 period. Use of a spatial Markov approach shows that non-metropolitan neighbours of metropolitan regions have tended to converge during the period, with roughly equal rates of upward and downward mobility within the distribution. Non-metropolitan regions, not neighbouring metropolitan regions, show much less tendency to converge and reveal higher rates of downward rather than upward mobility. Results highlight regional differences in mobility coherence, with metropolitan areas in the West tending to outpace their non-metropolitan neighbours. Copyright Springer-Verlag Berlin/Heidelberg 2004

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Papers in Regional Science.

Volume (Year): 83 (2004)
Issue (Month): 3 (07)
Pages: 543-563

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Handle: RePEc:spr:ecogov:v:83:y:2004:i:3:p:543-563

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Related research

Keywords: Distribution dynamics; convergence; spatial Markov chain; metropolitan; non-metropolitan;

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Cited by:
  1. Jhonny Moncada Mesa & David Hincapié Vélez, 2013. "Convergencia en calidad de vida en Medellín 2004-2011. Un análisis espacial no paramétrico," ENSAYOS SOBRE POLÍTICA ECONÓMICA, BANCO DE LA REPÚBLICA - ESPE.
  2. Kurt Geppert & Andreas Stephan, 2008. "Regional disparities in the European Union: Convergence and agglomeration," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 87(2), pages 193-217, 06.
  3. George W. Hammond & Eric Thompson, 2006. "Determinants of Income Growth in U.S. Metropolitan and Non-metropolitan Labor Markets," Working Papers 06-12 Classification- JEL, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
  4. Ismail H. GENC & Anil RUPASINGHA, 2009. "Time-series Tests of Stochastic Earnings Convergence across US Nonmetropolitan Counties, 1969-2004," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 9(2).
  5. Riccardo DiCecio & Charles S. Gascon, 2008. "Convergence in the United States: a tale of migration and urbanization," Working Papers 2008-002, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
  6. Chun-Yu Ho & Dan Li, 2007. "Catching Up or Falling Behind? Income Distribution of Chinese Cities," Boston University - Department of Economics - Working Papers Series WP2007-22, Boston University - Department of Economics.

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