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Is the relationship between socioeconomic status and health stronger for older children in developing countries?

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  • Lisa Cameron
  • Jenny Williams

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1353/dem.0.0054
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Demography.

Volume (Year): 46 (2009)
Issue (Month): 2 (May)
Pages: 303-324

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Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:46:y:2009:i:2:p:303-324

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Web page: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/13524

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References

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  1. Wolfe, Barbara L. & Behrman, Jere R., 1982. "Determinants of child mortality, health, and nutrition in a developing country," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(2), pages 163-193, October.
  2. Emmanuel Skoufias, 1999. "Parental Education and child Nutrition in Indonesia," Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(1), pages 99-119.
  3. World Bank, 2003. "World Development Indicators 2003," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13920, October.
  4. Lindeboom, Maarten & van Doorslaer, Eddy, 2004. "Cut-point shift and index shift in self-reported health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 1083-1099, November.
  5. Teresa Bago d’Uva & Eddy Van Doorslaer & Maarten Lindeboom & Owen O’Donnell & Somnath Chatterji, 2006. "Does reporting heterogeneity bias the measurement of health disparities?," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 06/03, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
  6. Plug, Erik & Vijverberg, Wim, 2000. "Schooling, Family Background, and Adoption: Is It Nature of Is It Nurture?," Discussion Papers 736, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.
  7. Lavy, V & Strauss, J & Thomas, D & de Vreyer, P, 1996. "Quality of Health Care, Survivial and Health Outcomes in Ghana," Papers 96-20, RAND - Reprint Series.
  8. Lisa Cameron, 2001. "The Impact Of The Indonesian Financial Crisis On Children: An Analysis Using The 100 Villages Data," Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(1), pages 43-64.
  9. Currie, Alison & Shields, Michael A. & Price, Stephen Wheatley, 2007. "The child health/family income gradient: Evidence from England," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 213-232, March.
  10. M. Dolores Montoya Diaz, 2002. "Socio-economic health inequalities in Brazil: gender and age effects," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(2), pages 141-154.
  11. Teresa Bago d'Uva & Eddy van Doorslaer & Maarten Lindeboom & Owen O'Donnell & Somnath Chatterji, 2006. "Does Reporting Heterogeneity bias the Measurement of Health Disparities?," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 06-033/3, Tinbergen Institute.
  12. Cebu Study Team, 1992. "A child health production function estimated from longitudinal data," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 323-351, April.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Edoka, I.P.;, 2012. "Decomposing Differences in Cotinine Distribution between Children and Adolescents from Different Socioeconomic Backgrounds," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 12/29, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
  2. Nakamura, Sayaka, 2014. "Parental income and child health in Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 42-55.
  3. Layte, Richard & Nolan, Anne, 2013. "Socioeconomic Inequalities in Child Health in Ireland," Papers WP453, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
  4. Paul Frijters & Michael A. Shields & Stephen Wheatley Price & Jenny Williams, 2011. "Quantifying the cost of passive smoking on child health: evidence from children's cotinine samples," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 174(1), pages 195-212, January.
  5. Felfe, Christina & Deuchert. Eva, 2011. "The tempest: Using a natural disaster to evaluate the link between wealth and child development," Economics Working Paper Series 1146, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science.
  6. Marta Jankowska & Magdalena Benza & John R. Weeks, 2013. "Estimating spatial inequalities of urban child mortality," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 28(2), pages 33-62, January.

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