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Estimating spatial inequalities of urban child mortality

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  • Marta Jankowska

    (San Diego State University)

  • Magdalena Benza

    (San Diego State University)

  • John R. Weeks

    (San Diego State University)

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    Abstract

    Recent studies indicate that the traditional rural-urban dichotomy that points to cities as places of better health in the developing worldcan be complicated by poverty differentials; many poor urban women experiencechild mortality burdens as high as their rural counterparts. However, little is known about spatial inequalities of child mortality in cities of developing nations. Knowledge of such spatial patterns is essential to designing effective intervention strategies, but is limited by lack of spatial data. Calculating child mortality is a data intensive process, and due to financial and time constraints, data are rarely collected with enough spatial spread to examine intra-urban patterns. In this study, we explore the utility of two minimum-data indirect methods for calculating child mortality that are able to include more cases and allow for greater spatial spread: (1) the combined Maternal Age Cohort and Maternal Age Period measures (MAC-MAP); and, (2) the Child Lost Measure (CLM). Data are pooled from three reproductive health surveys conducted inthe city of Accra, Ghana. Results indicate that child mortality measures using relaxed data standards follow expected patterns and differentials at the individual level, and can provide nuanced understanding of spatial intra-urban patterns of child mortality when mapped at the neighborhood level.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its journal Demographic Research.

    Volume (Year): 28 (2013)
    Issue (Month): 2 (January)
    Pages: 33-62

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    Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:28:y:2013:i:2

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    Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

    Related research

    Keywords: child mortality; Ghana; spatial analysis;

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    1. Wang, Limin, 2003. "Determinants of child mortality in LDCs: Empirical findings from demographic and health surveys," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 65(3), pages 277-299, September.
    2. Lisa Cameron & Jenny Williams, 2009. "Is the relationship between socioeconomic status and health stronger for older children in developing countries?," Demography, Springer, vol. 46(2), pages 303-324, May.
    3. Van de Poel, Ellen & O'Donnell, Owen & Van Doorslaer, Eddy, 2007. "Are urban children really healthier? Evidence from 47 developing countries," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 65(10), pages 1986-2003, November.
    4. Hentschel, Jesko, et al, 2000. "Combining Census and Survey Data to Trace the Spatial Dimensions of Poverty: A Case Study of Ecuador," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 14(1), pages 147-65, January.
    5. Kenneth Harttgen & Mark Misselhorn, 2006. "A Multilevel Approach to Explain Child Mortality and Undernutrition in South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa," Ibero America Institute for Econ. Research (IAI) Discussion Papers 152, Ibero-America Institute for Economic Research.
    6. Barbara Entwisle, 2007. "Putting people into place," Demography, Springer, vol. 44(4), pages 687-703, November.
    7. Dunn, James R. & Cummins, Steven, 2007. "Placing health in context," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 65(9), pages 1821-1824, November.
    8. Mark Montgomery & Paul Hewett, 2005. "Urban poverty and health in developing countries: Household and neighborhood Effects," Demography, Springer, vol. 42(3), pages 397-425, August.
    9. Fay, Marianne & Leipziger, Danny & Wodon, Quentin & Yepes, Tito, 2005. "Achieving child-health-related Millennium Development Goals: The role of infrastructure," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(8), pages 1267-1284, August.
    10. Elbers, Chris & Lanjouw, Peter & Mistiaen, Johan & Ozler, Berk & Simler, Kenneth, 2003. "Are Neighbours Equal? Estimating Local Inequality in Three Developing Countries," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
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