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Commuting Times: Is There Any Penalty for Immigrants?

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  • Maite Blázquez

    (Departmento de Análisis Económico: Teoría Económica e Historia Económica, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, Madrid, 28049, Spain, maite.blazquez@uam.es)

  • Carlos Llano

    (Departmento de Análisis Económico: Teoría Económica e Historia Económica, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, Madrid, 28049, Spain, carlos.llano@uam.es)

  • Julian Moral

    (Departmento de Análisis Económico: Teoría Económica e Historia Económica, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, Madrid, 28049, Spain, julian.moral@uam.es)

Abstract

The assimilation of immigrants and their impact on the labour market of the host country have become a growing subject of study in recent literature. This is a topic of particular interest in countries like Spain, where immigration has become one of the main challenges of government policy in recent years. The Madrid region has experienced one of the highest increases in the number of foreign residents between 1996 and 2007. The intensity of this inflow in such a short period of time has led to restrictions on the ability of the residential and labour market to absorb all these newcomers, limiting their choice set of available dwellings and jobs. In this paper the spatial mismatch hypothesis for the Madrid region is tested by exploring the relationship between immigrants’ residential location and employment accessibility as measured by commuting times. The findings reveal that immigrants from eastern Europe, Africa, Ecuador and Colombia are significantly more likely to experience higher commuting times when compared with natives. These differences in commuting times can be attributed to different preferences regarding dwelling and employment optimal decisions. However, they could also be seen as symptoms of residential segregation and the difficulties in employment accessibility experienced by immigrant groups.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Urban Studies Journal Limited in its journal Urban Studies.

Volume (Year): 47 (2010)
Issue (Month): 8 (July)
Pages: 1663-1686

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Handle: RePEc:sae:urbstu:v:47:y:2010:i:8:p:1663-1686

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Web page: http://www.gla.ac.uk/departments/urbanstudiesjournal

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  1. Epstein, Gil S., 2002. "Informational Cascades and Decision to Migrate," IZA Discussion Papers 445, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Louis de Mesnard, 2004. "Biproportional Methods of Structural Change Analysis: A Typological Survey," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(2), pages 205-230.
  3. Rouwendal, Jan, 1999. "Spatial job search and commuting distances," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 491-517, July.
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Cited by:
  1. Daniel Chatman, 2014. "Explaining the “immigrant effect” on auto use: the influences of neighborhoods and preferences," Transportation, Springer, vol. 41(3), pages 441-461, May.
  2. Ribar, David C., 2012. "Immigrants' Time Use: A Survey of Methods and Evidence," IZA Discussion Papers 6931, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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