Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Race and Ethnicity Assessment in Baseball Card Markets

Contents:

Author Info

  • Rodney Fort

    (Washington State University)

  • Andrew Gill

    (California State University, Fullerton)

Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    There is a growing literature investigating fan discrimination revealed in markets for sports memorabilia. Such estimates miss the mark for two reasons. First, simply measuring race as a binary variable may be less insightful than an alternative measure. Second, although it is the race perceptions of market participants that matter, past studies rely exclusively on researcher race/ethnicity assessment. The authors provide an estimation framework using continuous, market participant reports of race/ethnicity. The results show that past race/ethnicity results in card markets suffer from errors in variables and that continuous, market participant reports of race/ethnicity provide (carefully defined) "better" estimation results. The authors find that race/ethnicity matters and in a way is consistent with a model of statistical discrimination by those baseball fans who trade in the card market. The discrimination is against Black and Hispanic hitters and Black pitchers but not against Hispanic pitchers.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://jse.sagepub.com/content/1/1/21.abstract
    Download Restriction: no

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by in its journal Journal of Sports Economics.

    Volume (Year): 1 (2000)
    Issue (Month): 1 (February)
    Pages: 21-38

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:sae:jospec:v:1:y:2000:i:1:p:21-38

    Contact details of provider:

    Related research

    Keywords: Discrimination; Race; Sports;

    Find related papers by JEL classification:

    References

    No references listed on IDEAS
    You can help add them by filling out this form.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Matthew C. Palmer & Randall H. King, 2006. "Has Salary Discrimination Really Disappeared From Major League Baseball?," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 32(2), pages 285-297, Spring.
    2. Tainsky, Scott & Mills, Brian & Winfree, Jason A., 2012. "Further Examination of Potential Discrimination Among MLB Umpires," MPRA Paper 43234, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. David W. Findlay & John M. Santos, 2012. "Race, Ethnicity, and Baseball Card Prices: A Replication, Correction, and Extension of Hewitt, Muñoz, Oliver, and Regoli," Econ Journal Watch, Econ Journal Watch, vol. 9(2), pages 122-140, May.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:sae:jospec:v:1:y:2000:i:1:p:21-38. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (SAGE Publications).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.