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Labor force exit decisions of new mothers

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Author Info

  • Julie Hotchkiss

    ()

  • M. Pitts

    ()

  • Mary Walker

    ()

Abstract

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11150-010-9114-1
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Review of Economics of the Household.

Volume (Year): 9 (2011)
Issue (Month): 3 (September)
Pages: 397-414

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Handle: RePEc:kap:reveho:v:9:y:2011:i:3:p:397-414

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Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=109451

Related research

Keywords: Labor force participation; Labor supply; Labor market exit decisions; Opt out; Administrative data;

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
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  1. Christopher J. Ruhm, 1996. "The Economic Consequences of Parental Leave Mandates: Lessons from Europe," NBER Working Papers 5688, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. C. Katharina Spiess & Jan Ondrich & Qing Yang, 1996. "Barefoot and in a German kitchen: Federal parental leave and benefit policy and the return to work after childbirth in Germany," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 247-266.
  3. Chinhui Juhn & Simon Potter, 2006. "Changes in Labor Force Participation in the United States," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 20(3), pages 27-46, Summer.
  4. Patricia Ketsche & E. Kathleen Adams & Karen Minyard & Rebecca Kellenberg, 2007. "The stigma of public programs: Does a separate S-CHIP program reduce it?," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(4), pages 775-790.
  5. Gustafsson, Siv S, et al, 1996. "Women's Labor Force Transitions in Connection with Childbirth: A Panel Data Comparison between Germany, Sweden and Great Britain," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 223-46, August.
  6. Susan L. Averett & Leslie A. Whittington, 2001. "Does Maternity Leave Induce Births?," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 68(2), pages 403-417, October.
  7. Barrow, Lisa, 1999. "An Analysis of Women's Return-to-Work Decisions following First Birth," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, Western Economic Association International, vol. 37(3), pages 432-51, July.
  8. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts & John C. Robertson, 2004. "Wage gains among job changers across the business cycle:> insight from state administrative data," Working Paper, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta 2004-19, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  9. Chiara Pronzato, 2008. "Return to work after childbirth: Does parental leave matter in Europe?," Working Papers 014, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
  10. Julie L. Hotchkiss & John C. Robertson, 2006. "Asymmetric labor force participation decisions over the business cycle: evidence from U.S. microdata," Working Paper, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta 2006-08, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  11. Charles Brown & James L. Medoff, 2003. "Firm Age and Wages," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 21(3), pages 677-698, July.
  12. Eiko Kenjoh, 2005. "New Mothers' Employment and Public Policy in the UK, Germany, the Netherlands, Sweden, and Japan," LABOUR, CEIS, CEIS, vol. 19(s1), pages 5-49, December.
  13. Elina Pylkkänen & Nina Smith, 2003. "Career Interruptions Due to Parental Leave: A Comparative Study of Denmark and Sweden," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 1, OECD Publishing.
  14. Simon Burgess & Paul Gregg & Carol Propper & Elizabeth Washbrook & ALSPAC Study Team, 2002. "Maternity Rights and Mothers' Return to Work," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 02/055, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  15. Jacob Alex Klerman & Arleen Leibowitz, 1994. "The Work-Employment Distinction among New Mothers," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 29(2), pages 277-303.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. María Davia & Nuria Legazpe, 2014. "Determinants of Employment Decisions After the First Child Birth in Spain," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 35(2), pages 214-227, June.
  2. Joni Hersch, 2013. "Opting out among women with elite education," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, Springer, vol. 11(4), pages 469-506, December.

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