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Employment after childbearing: a comparative study of Italy and Norway

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  • Magdalena M. Muszynska

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)

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    Abstract

    In this study we look at the circumstances under which motherhood and employment are compatible. Comparing two countries, Italy and Norway, we analyze the impact of macro factors and individual characteristics on employment decisions of first- and second-time mothers. Our results show that in Norway, where flexible forms of employment are a popular way to reconcile family life and employment, not only many women start to work when their child is small, but the fertility is also relatively high. In Italy, characterized by high rigidities of the labor market and where flexible forms of employment are hardly available, relatively few mothers enter employment and fertility is low. In addition, we found that in both countries better educated women and women with more work experience return to their jobs relatively soon after childbirth. The majority of women with a low level of education and who did not work before the childbirth do not take up work when the child is small.

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    File URL: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/papers/working/wp-2004-030.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its series MPIDR Working Papers with number WP-2004-030.

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    Length: 37 pages
    Date of creation: Dec 2004
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:dem:wpaper:wp-2004-030

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    Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

    Related research

    Keywords: Italy; Norway; female employment; fertility; working life;

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    1. Namkee Ahn & Pedro Mira, . "A note on the changing relationship between fertility and female employment rates in developed countries," Working Papers 99-09, FEDEA.
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    13. Adam, Paula, 1996. "Mothers in an Insider-Outsider Economy: The Puzzle of Spain," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 301-23, August.
    14. Paula Adam, 1996. "Mothers in an insider-outsider economy: The puzzle of Spain," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 301-323.
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