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Wage gains among job changers across the business cycle:> insight from state administrative data

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  • Julie L. Hotchkiss
  • M. Melinda Pitts
  • John C. Robertson

Abstract

This paper uses unique employer-employee matched administrative data files to determine that firm and industry employment dynamics play significant roles in the earnings gains of workers who change jobs and in different ways across the business cycle. Among the more notable results is the finding that job-changers who leave a firm that is shutting down experience a greater earnings loss than job-changers who leave a firm that is merely contracting. In addition, the earnings loss from changing industries where firm-specific human capital is likely to be important has the potential of creating a much greater barrier to labor mobility during recessionary times than during an expansion.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta in its series Working Paper with number 2004-19.

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Date of creation: 2004
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Handle: RePEc:fip:fedawp:2004-19

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References

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  1. Gibbons, R. & Katz, L.F., 1989. "Layoffs And Lemons," Working papers 531, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
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  15. Groshen, Erica L, 1991. "Sources of Intra-industry Wage Dispersion: How Much Do Employers Matter?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 106(3), pages 869-84, August.
  16. John J. Antel, 1991. "The wage effects of voluntary labor mobility with and without intervening unemployment," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 44(2), pages 299-306, January.
  17. McLaughlin, Kenneth J, 1991. "A Theory of Quits and Layoffs with Efficient Turnover," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(1), pages 1-29, February.
  18. Harry J. Holzer & Julia I. Lane & Lars Vilhuber, 2004. "Escaping low earnings: The role of employer characteristics and changes," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 57(4), pages 560-578, July.
  19. Jacob Mincer, 1986. "Wage Changes in Job Changes," NBER Working Papers 1907, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  21. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts & John C. Robertson, 2003. "The ups and downs of jobs in Georgia: what can we learn about employment dynamics from state administrative data?," Working Paper 2003-38, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  22. Neal, Derek, 1995. "Industry-Specific Human Capital: Evidence from Displaced Workers," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 13(4), pages 653-77, October.
  23. Ann Huff Stevens, 1995. "Long-Term Effects of Job Displacement: Evidence from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics," NBER Working Papers 5343, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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Cited by:
  1. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts & John C. Robertson, 2005. "Earnings on the information technology roller coaster: insight from matched employer-employee data," Working Paper 2005-11, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  2. Julie Hotchkiss & M. Pitts & Mary Walker, 2011. "Labor force exit decisions of new mothers," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 397-414, September.
  3. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts & John C. Robertson, 2006. "The push-pull effects of the information technology boom and bust: insight from matched employer-employee data," Working Paper 2006-01, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

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