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Why Speed Doesn’t Kill: Learning to Believe in Disinflation

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  • Eric Schaling

    ()

  • Marco Hoeberichts

    ()

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10645-010-9136-3
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal De Economist.

Volume (Year): 158 (2010)
Issue (Month): 1 (April)
Pages: 23-42

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Handle: RePEc:kap:decono:v:158:y:2010:i:1:p:23-42

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Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=100260

Related research

Keywords: learning; disinflation; credibility; sacrifice ratio; E52; E58;

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References

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  1. Beck, Gunter W. & Wieland, Volker, 2002. "Learning and control in a changing economic environment," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 26(9-10), pages 1359-1377, August.
  2. Gaspar, Vítor & Smets, Frank & Vestin, David, 2006. "Adaptive learning, persistence, and optimal monetary policy," Working Paper Series 0644, European Central Bank.
  3. Fabio Milani, 2005. "Adaptive Learning and Inflation Persistence," Macroeconomics 0506013, EconWPA.
  4. Klok, H.J. & Schaik, A.B.T.M. van & Smulders, J.A., 2001. "Economologues: Liber Amicorum voor Theo van de Klundert," Open Access publications from Tilburg University urn:nbn:nl:ui:12-86472, Tilburg University.
  5. Bullard, J. & Schaling, E., 2000. "New Economy - New Policy Rules?," Discussion Paper 2000-72, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
  6. Antulio N. Bomfim & Glenn D. Rudebusch, 1997. "Opportunistic and deliberate disinflation under imperfect credibility," Working Papers in Applied Economic Theory 97-07, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
  7. Antulio Bomfim & Robert Tetlow & Peter Von Zur Muehlen & John Williams, 1997. "Expectations, learning and the costs of disinflation: experiments using the FRB/US model," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 1997-42, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  8. Eijffinger, Sylvester C W & Schaling, Eric & Tesfaselassie, Mewael F., 2006. "Learning About the Term Structure and Optimal Rules for Inflation Targeting," CEPR Discussion Papers 5896, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  9. Andrew J. Filardo, 1998. "New evidence on the output cost of fighting inflation," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Q III.
  10. John M. Roberts, 2007. "Learning, Sticky Inflation, and the Sacrifice Ratio," Kiel Working Papers 1365, Kiel Institute for the World Economy.
  11. Eric Schaling, 1999. "The non-linear Phillips curve and inflation forecast targeting," Bank of England working papers 98, Bank of England.
  12. Timothy Cogley & Riccardo Colacito & Thomas J. Sargent, 2005. "Benefits from U.S. monetary policy experimentation in the days of Samuelson and Solow and Lucas," Proceedings, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  13. Michael T. Kiley, 2008. "Monetary policy actions and long-run inflation expectations," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2008-03, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  14. Guido Ascari & Tiziano Ropele, 2010. "Sacrifice ratio or welfare gain ratio? Disinflation in a DSGE monetary model," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 736, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  15. Vestin, David, 2006. "Price-level versus inflation targeting," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(7), pages 1361-1376, October.
  16. Eric Schaling & Marco Hoeberichts, 2010. "Why Speed Doesn’t Kill: Learning to Believe in Disinflation," Working Papers 164, Economic Research Southern Africa.
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Cited by:
  1. Mewael F. Tesfaselassie & Eric Schaling, 2009. "Managing Disinflation under Uncertainty," Working Papers 145, Economic Research Southern Africa.
  2. Schaling, Eric, 2003. "Learning, inflation expectations and optimal monetary policy," Research Discussion Papers 20/2003, Bank of Finland.

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