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Trading as Entertainment?

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Author Info

  • Daniel Dorn

    ()
    (LeBow College of Business, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104)

  • Paul Sengmueller

    ()
    (CentER, Tilburg University, 5000 LE Tilburg, The Netherlands)

Abstract

Among 1,000 German brokerage clients for whom both survey responses and actual trading records are available, investors who report enjoying investing or gambling turn over their portfolio at twice the rate of their peers. Including entertainment attributes as additional explanatory variables in cross-sectional regressions of portfolio turnover on objective investor attributes more than doubles the fraction of the total variation of portfolio turnover that can be explained. The results are robust to controlling for gender and proxies for overconfidence constructed from survey responses. Nonpecuniary benefits of trading thus appear to offer a straightforward explanation of the "excessive trading puzzle."

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File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/mnsc.1080.0962
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by INFORMS in its journal Management Science.

Volume (Year): 55 (2009)
Issue (Month): 4 (April)
Pages: 591-603

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Handle: RePEc:inm:ormnsc:v:55:y:2009:i:4:p:591-603

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Related research

Keywords: investor decision making; trading volume;

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Kumar, Alok & Page, Jeremy K. & Spalt, Oliver G., 2011. "Religious beliefs, gambling attitudes, and financial market outcomes," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 102(3), pages 671-708.
  2. Matthew Hood & John Nofsinger & Abhishek Varma, 2014. "Conservation, Discrimination, and Salvation: Investors’ Social Concerns in the Stock Market," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer, vol. 45(1), pages 5-37, February.
  3. Markus Glaser & Martin Weber, 2007. "Overconfidence and trading volume," The Geneva Papers on Risk and Insurance Theory, Springer, vol. 32(1), pages 1-36, June.
  4. Margarida Abreu & Victor Mendes, 2011. "Information, Overconfidence and Trading: Do the Sources of Information Matter?," Working Papers Department of Economics 2011/25, ISEG - School of Economics and Management, Department of Economics, University of Lisbon.
  5. Dorn, Daniel, 2010. "Investors with too many options?," Working Paper Series 1197, European Central Bank.
  6. Abreu, Margarida & Mendes, Victor, 2012. "Information, overconfidence and trading: Do the sources of information matter?," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 868-881.
  7. Philippe Bernard & Michel Blanchard, 2013. "The performance of amateur traders on a public internet site: a case of a stock-exchange contest," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(3), pages 1729-1737.
  8. Puustinen, Pekka & Maas, Peter & Karjaluoto, Heikki, 2013. "Development and validation of the Perceived Investment Value (PIV) scale," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 41-54.
  9. Bauer, Rob & Cosemans, Mathijs & Eichholtz, Piet, 2009. "Option trading and individual investor performance," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 731-746, April.
  10. Hoffmann, Arvid O.I. & Post, Thomas & Pennings, Joost M.E., 2013. "Individual investor perceptions and behavior during the financial crisis," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 60-74.

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