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Investor Competence, Trading Frequency, and Home Bias

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  • John R. Graham
  • Campbell R. Harvey
  • Hai Huang

Abstract

People are more willing to bet on their own judgments when they feel skillful or knowledgeable (Heath and Tversky (1991)). We investigate whether this "competence effect" influences trading frequency and home bias. We find that investors who feel competent trade more often and have a more internationally diversified portfolio. We also find that male investors, and investors with higher income or more education, are more likely to perceive themselves as competent investors than are female investors, and investors with lower income or less education. Our results are unlikely to be explained by other hypotheses, such as overconfidence or information advantage. Finally, we separately establish a link between optimism towards the home market and international portfolio diversification.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 11426.

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Date of creation: Jun 2005
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Publication status: published as Graham, John R., Hai Huang, and Cam Harvey. "Investor Competence, Trading Frequency, and Home Bias." Management Science 55 (2009): 1094-1106.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:11426

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