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Grand missions of agricultural innovation

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Author Info

  • Wright, Brian D.

Abstract

This paper discusses three related examples of mission-oriented agricultural institutional innovations associated with substantial crop yield increases in the 20th century. It begins with the implementation of the United States Land-Grant System and then discusses in turn the planning and implementation of the two grand missions that led successively to the yield increases in wheat and rice that heralded the onset of the “Green Revolution.” It notes the remarkable role of the Rockefeller Foundation in identifying these two missions, and selecting personnel developed within the land-grant system to execute them with remarkable effectiveness.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Research Policy.

Volume (Year): 41 (2012)
Issue (Month): 10 ()
Pages: 1716-1728

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Handle: RePEc:eee:respol:v:41:y:2012:i:10:p:1716-1728

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/respol

Related research

Keywords: Research; Agriculture; Institutions; Innovation; Foundations;

References

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  1. J. Bradford De Long & Barry Eichengreen, 1993. "The Marshall Plan: History's Most Successful Structural Adjustment Programme," J. Bradford De Long's Working Papers _109, University of California at Berkeley, Economics Department.
  2. Guttman, Joel M, 1978. "Interest Groups and the Demand for Agricultural Research," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(3), pages 467-84, June.
  3. Alston, Julian M. & Pardey, Philip G. & Roseboom, Johannes, 1998. "Financing agricultural research: International investment patterns and policy perspectives," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 26(6), pages 1057-1071, June.
  4. Alan L. Olmstead & Paul W. Rhode, 2008. "Biological Innovation and Productivity Growth in the Antebellum Cotton Economy," NBER Working Papers 14142, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  6. Fogel, Robert W, 2004. "Health, Nutrition, and Economic Growth," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 52(3), pages 643-58, April.
  7. Lele, Uma & Goldsmith, Arthur A, 1989. "The Development of National Agricultural Research Capacity: India's Experience with the Rockefeller Foundation and Its Significance for Africa," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 37(2), pages 305-43, January.
  8. Richard Sutch, 2011. "The Impact of the 1936 Corn Belt Drought on American Farmers’ Adoption of Hybrid Corn," NBER Chapters, in: The Economics of Climate Change: Adaptations Past and Present, pages 195-223 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Wallace E. Huffman & Robert E. Evenson, 2006. "Do Formula or Competitive Grant Funds Have Greater Impacts on State Agricultural Productivity?," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 88(4), pages 783-798.
  10. Huffman, Wallace, 1992. "Economic Principles and Incentives: Structure, Management, and Funding of Agricultural Research in the United States," Staff General Research Papers 10992, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  11. Herdt, Robert W., 2012. "People, institutions, and technology: A personal view of the role of foundations in international agricultural research and development 1960–2010," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 179-190.
  12. Miranowski, John & Huffman, Wallace, 1981. "An Economic Analysis of Expenditures on Agricultural Experiment Station Research," Staff General Research Papers 10719, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  13. Wallace E. Huffman & Just, Richard E., 2010. "Setting Incentives for Scientists Who Engage in Research and Other Activities: An Application of Principal-Agent Theory," Staff General Research Papers 31647, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  14. Johnson, D Gale, 1997. "Agriculture and the Wealth of Nations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(2), pages 1-12, May.
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Cited by:
  1. Mowery, David C., 2012. "Defense-related R&D as a model for “Grand Challenges” technology policies," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(10), pages 1703-1715.

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