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Cultural differences between Tibetans and ethnic Han Chinese in ultimatum bargaining experiments

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  • Chen, Kang
  • Tang, Fang-Fang
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    Abstract

    We compare ultimatum bargaining behaviour between Tibetans in Lhasa and ethnic Han Chinese in Xiamen with a focus on identifying how cultural traits and religious beliefs affect behaviour. A control group in Singapore was used to account for possible non-cultural explanations for the observed behavioural differences. It was found that, compared to Han Chinese, Tibetans are more likely to accept offers in the ultimatum game and that their decisions are unrelated to the actual offer size.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal European Journal of Political Economy.

    Volume (Year): 25 (2009)
    Issue (Month): 1 (March)
    Pages: 78-84

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:poleco:v:25:y:2009:i:1:p:78-84

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505544

    Related research

    Keywords: Ultimatum game Cultural differences Religion;

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    Cited by:
    1. Werner Güth & Martin G. Kocher, 2013. "More than thirty years of ultimatum bargaining experiments: Motives, variations, and a survey of the recent literature," Jena Economic Research Papers 2013-035, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Max-Planck-Institute of Economics.
    2. Staffiero, Gianandrea & Exadaktylos, Filippos & Espín, Antonio M., 2013. "Accepting zero in the ultimatum game does not reflect selfish preferences," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 121(2), pages 236-238.
    3. Gary Charness & Peter J. Kuhn, 2010. "Lab Labor: What Can Labor Economists Learn from the Lab?," NBER Working Papers 15913, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Heinrich Ursprung, 2012. "The evolution of sharing rules in rent seeking contests: Incentives crowd out cooperation," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 153(1), pages 149-161, October.
    5. Horak, Sven, 2013. "Cross-cultural experimental economics and indigenous management research: Issues and contributions," Duisburger Arbeitspapiere Ostasienwissenschaften 92/2013, University of Duisburg-Essen, Institute of East Asian Studies IN-EAST.
    6. John D. Griffin & David Nickerson & Abigail K. Wozniak, 2011. "Racial Differences in Inequality Aversion: Evidence from Real World Respondents in the Ultimatum Game," NBER Working Papers 17097, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Hillman, Arye L., 2010. "Expressive behavior in economics and politics," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 403-418, December.
    8. Gianandrea Staffiero & Filippos Exadaktylos & Antonio M. Espín, 2013. "Accepting Zero in the Ultimatum Game: Selfish Nash Response?," ThE Papers 13/01, Department of Economic Theory and Economic History of the University of Granada..

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