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The influence of social relationships on pro-environment behaviors

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  • Videras, Julio
  • Owen, Ann L.
  • Conover, Emily
  • Wu, Stephen

Abstract

We examine how social relationships are related to pro-environment behaviors. We use new data from a nationally representative US sample to estimate latent cluster models in which we describe individuals' profiles of social ties with family, neighbor, and coworkers along two dimensions: intensity of connections and pro-environment norms. While our results confirm the link between social ties and economic behaviors, we show that ties among relatives, neighbors, and coworkers are not perfect substitutes. In particular, we observe consistent relationships between green family profiles and altruistic and community-based behaviors. We also find that the effect of coworker ties is visible for cost-saving activities and altruistic behaviors, and that neighbors matter for working with others in the community to solve a local problem, volunteering, and recycling.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Environmental Economics and Management.

Volume (Year): 63 (2012)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 35-50

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jeeman:v:63:y:2012:i:1:p:35-50

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622870

Related research

Keywords: Pro-environment behaviors; Social relationships; Latent cluster models;

References

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Cited by:
  1. Mikołaj Czajkowski & Tadeusz Kądziela & Nick Hanley, 2012. "We want to sort! – assessing households’ preferences for sorting waste," Working Papers 2012-07, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.
  2. Cavalcanti, Carina & Engel, Stefanie & Leibbrandt, Andreas, 2013. "Social integration, participation, and community resource management," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 65(2), pages 262-276.
  3. Mikołaj Czajkowski & Nick Hanley & Karine Nyborg, 2014. "Social norms, morals and self-interest as determinants of pro-environment behaviour," Working Papers 2014-17, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.

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