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Productivity effects of innovation, stress and social relations

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  • Cowan, Robin
  • Sanditov, Bulat
  • Weehuizen, Rifka

Abstract

Abstract Innovation is a source of increasing productivity, but also of stress. Psychological research shows that individual productivity increases and then decreases as stress levels increase. Agents' stress levels are determined by their own coping ability and by positive and negative spillovers to their social contacts. We model stress and inter-agent dynamics, identifying the relationships between innovation, stress and productivity. We characterize conditions under which multiple equilibria in stress levels and growth rates exist; and under which the dynamics exhibit hysteresis. High rates of innovation can result in high stress equilibrium and have a negative effect on economic growth.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization.

Volume (Year): 79 (2011)
Issue (Month): 3 (August)
Pages: 165-182

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:79:y:2011:i:3:p:165-182

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Keywords: Innovation Stress Social relationships;

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