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Last shall be first: A field study of biases in sequential performance evaluation on the Idol series

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  • Page, Lionel
  • Page, Katie
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    Abstract

    When performances are evaluated they are very often presented in a sequential order. Previous research suggests that the sequential presentation of alternatives may induce systematic biases in the way performances are evaluated. Such a phenomenon has been scarcely studied in economics. Using a large dataset of performance evaluation in the Idol series (N=1522), this paper presents new evidence about the systematic biases in sequential evaluation of performances and the psychological phenomena at the origin of these biases.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6V8F-4X5JSNJ-1/2/47fb9bdb5fb5b15031538ca1d9d96957
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization.

    Volume (Year): 73 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 2 (February)
    Pages: 186-198

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:73:y:2010:i:2:p:186-198

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jebo

    Related research

    Keywords: Order effects Memory Television show;

    References

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    Cited by:
    1. Stefan D. Haigner & Stefan Jenewein & Hans-Christian Müller & Florian Wakolbinger, 2010. "The first shall be last: Serial position effects in the case contestants evaluate each other," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 30(4), pages 3170-3176.
    2. Pierre-Guillaume Méon & Ariane Szafarz, 2011. "The Modern Corporation as a Safe Haven for Taste-Based Discrimination: An Agency Model of Hiring Decisions," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/88635, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    3. David Schüller & Thorsten Upmann, 2013. "When Focal Points are Out of Focus: A Game-Theoretic Analysis of Come Dine with Me," CESifo Working Paper Series 4138, CESifo Group Munich.

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