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Markov-switching and the Beveridge-Nelson decomposition: Has US output persistence changed since 1984?

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  • Kim, Chang-Jin

Abstract

We show that, for a class of univariate and multivariate Markov-switching models, exact calculation of the Beveridge-Nelson (BN) trend/cycle components is possible. The key to exact BN trend/cycle decomposition is to recognize that the latent first-order Markov-switching process in the model has an AR(1) representation, and that the model can be cast into a state-space form. Given the state-space representation, we show that impulse-response function analysis can be processed with respect to either an asymmetric discrete shock or to a symmetric continuous shock. The method presented is applied to Kim, Morley, Piger's [Kim, C.-J., Morley, J., Piger, J., 2005. Nonlinearity and the permanent effects of recessions. Journal of Applied Econometrics 20, 291-309] univariate Markov-switching model of real GDP with a post-recession 'bounce-back' effect and Cochrane's [Cochrane, J.H., 1994. Permanent and transitory components of GNP and stock prices. Quarterly Journal of Economics 109, 241-263] vector error correction model of real GDP and real consumption extended to incorporate Markov-switching. The parameter estimates, the BN trend/cycle components, and the impulse-response function analysis for each of these empirical models suggest that the persistence of US real GDP has increased since the mid-1980's.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Econometrics.

Volume (Year): 146 (2008)
Issue (Month): 2 (October)
Pages: 227-240

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Handle: RePEc:eee:econom:v:146:y:2008:i:2:p:227-240

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jeconom

Related research

Keywords: Beveridge-Nelson decomposition Markov switching Impulse-response function Persistence of real output State-space representation;

References

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  1. Chin Nam Low & Heather Anderson & Ralph Snyder, 2006. "Beveridge-Nelson Decomposition with Markov Switching," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2006n14, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  2. Hamilton, James D, 1989. "A New Approach to the Economic Analysis of Nonstationary Time Series and the Business Cycle," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 57(2), pages 357-84, March.
  3. Kim, Chang-Jin & Nelson, Charles R & Piger, Jeremy, 2004. "The Less-Volatile U.S. Economy: A Bayesian Investigation of Timing, Breadth, and Potential Explanations," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 22(1), pages 80-93, January.
  4. Kim, Chang-Jin & Piger, Jeremy & Startz, Richard, 2008. "Estimation of Markov regime-switching regression models with endogenous switching," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 143(2), pages 263-273, April.
  5. James C. Morley & Charles Nelson & Eric Zivot, 2000. "Why Are Beveridge-Nelson and Unobserved-Component Decompositions of GDP So Different?," Discussion Papers in Economics at the University of Washington 0013, Department of Economics at the University of Washington.
  6. Olivier Blanchard & John Simon, 2001. "The Long and Large Decline in U.S. Output Volatility," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 32(1), pages 135-174.
  7. James H. Stock & Mark W. Watson, 2003. "Understanding Changes in International Business Cycle Dynamics," NBER Working Papers 9859, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Cochrane, John H, 1994. "Permanent and Transitory Components of GNP and Stock Prices," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 109(1), pages 241-65, February.
  9. Timothy Cogley, . "How Fast Can the New Economy Grow? A Bayesian Analysis of the Evolution of Trend Growth," Working Papers 2133301, Department of Economics, W. P. Carey School of Business, Arizona State University.
  10. Christopher A. Sims & Tao Zha, 2006. "Were There Regime Switches in U.S. Monetary Policy?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(1), pages 54-81, March.
  11. Beaudry, Paul & Koop, Gary, 1993. "Do recessions permanently change output?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 149-163, April.
  12. Jeremy Piger & James Morley & Chang-Jin Kim, 2005. "Nonlinearity and the permanent effects of recessions," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(2), pages 291-309.
  13. Harvey, A C, 1985. "Trends and Cycles in Macroeconomic Time Series," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 3(3), pages 216-27, June.
  14. Canova, Fabio & Gambetti, Luca & Pappa, Evi, 2006. "The Structural Dynamics of US Output and Inflation: What Explains the Changes?," CEPR Discussion Papers 5879, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  15. Perron, Pierre, 1990. "Testing for a Unit Root in a Time Series with a Changing Mean," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 8(2), pages 153-62, April.
  16. Daniel E. Sichel, 1992. "Inventories and the three phases of the business cycle," Working Paper Series / Economic Activity Section 128, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  17. Morley, James & Piger, Jeremy, 2008. "Trend/cycle decomposition of regime-switching processes," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 146(2), pages 220-226, October.
  18. Clark, Peter K, 1987. "The Cyclical Component of U.S. Economic Activity," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 102(4), pages 797-814, November.
  19. Beveridge, Stephen & Nelson, Charles R., 1981. "A new approach to decomposition of economic time series into permanent and transitory components with particular attention to measurement of the `business cycle'," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 151-174.
  20. Miller, Stephen M., 1988. "The Beveridge-Nelson decomposition of economic time series : Another economical computational method," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 141-142, January.
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