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An application of models of speculative behaviour to oil prices

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  • Shi, Shuping
  • Arora, Vipin

Abstract

We estimate three different models of speculative behaviour using oil price data. Our findings provide support for the claim by Phillips and Yu (2011) and Gilbert (2010) that a bubble in oil prices existed for a short period in 2008.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics Letters.

Volume (Year): 115 (2012)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 469-472

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:115:y:2012:i:3:p:469-472

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolet

Related research

Keywords: Oil price; Bubble; Speculative behaviour; Three-regime; Estimation;

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References

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  1. Pindyck, Robert S, 1993. "The Present Value Model of Rational Commodity Pricing," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 103(418), pages 511-30, May.
  2. John Y. Campbell & Robert J. Shiller, 1986. "Cointegration and Tests of Present Value Models," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 785, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
  3. Chris Brooks & Apostolos Katsaris, 2005. "A Three-Regime Model of Speculative Behaviour: Modelling the Evolution of the S&P 500 Composite Index," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(505), pages 767-797, 07.
  4. Simon van Norden & Huntley Schaller & ), 1995. "Fads or Bubbles?," Econometrics 9502004, EconWPA, revised 06 Jun 1995.
  5. Peter C. B. Phillips & Yangru Wu & Jun Yu, 2007. "Explosive Behavior in the 1990s Nasdaq: When Did Exuberance Escalate Asset Values?," Working Papers 222007, Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research.
  6. Peter C. B. Phillips & Jun Yu, 2009. "Dating the Timeline of Financial Bubbles During the Subprime Crisis," Working Papers 18-2009, Singapore Management University, School of Economics.
  7. Lucas, Robert E, Jr, 1978. "Asset Prices in an Exchange Economy," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(6), pages 1429-45, November.
  8. Engle, Robert F, 1982. "Autoregressive Conditional Heteroscedasticity with Estimates of the Variance of United Kingdom Inflation," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(4), pages 987-1007, July.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Song, Yong & Shi, Shuping, 2012. "Identifying speculative bubbles with an in finite hidden Markov model," MPRA Paper 36455, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Koliai, Lyes & Avouyi-Dovi, Sanvi & Ano Sujithan, Kuhanathan, 2014. "On the determinants of food price volatility," Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine 123456789/12798, Paris Dauphine University.
  3. Vipin Arora & Shuping Shi, 2013. "A Heterogenous Agent Foundation for Tests of Asset Price Bubbles," CAMA Working Papers 2013-35, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  4. Claudio Morana, 2013. "Oil price dynamics, macro-finance interactions and the role of financial speculation," Working Papers 225, University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Economics, revised Nov 2013.
  5. Arora, Vipin & Tanner, Matthew, 2013. "Do oil prices respond to real interest rates?," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 546-555.
  6. Hendrik Kaufmannz & Robinson Kruse, 2013. "Bias-corrected estimation in potentially mildly explosive autoregressive models," CREATES Research Papers 2013-10, School of Economics and Management, University of Aarhus.
  7. Vipin Arora & Pedro Gomis-Porqueras & Shuping Shi, 2011. "Testing for Explosive Behaviour in Relative Inflation Measures: Implications for Monetary Policy," Development Research Unit Working Paper Series 37-11, Monash University, Department of Economics.

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