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Pasture taxes and agricultural intensification in southern Mali

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  • Dalton, Timothy J.
  • A. Masters, William

Abstract

This study integrates biophysical simulation data with a farm household model of intertemporal optimization, to investigate changing crop-livestock management practices in the Sudano-Guinean zone of Mali. Over a 15-yr time horizon we find that free grazing on the commons remains more attractive to the representative household than adopting more labor- and capitalintensive confinement systems, but that a relatively low level of pasture tax (around US$3 per livestock unit per year) would be sufficient to induce intensification. Because confinement raises output, the net cost of the tax to the household is only about US$1 per unit per year. Imposing pasture taxes to induce intensification could raise community welfare, if the value of commons resources liberated by reduced grazing pressure exceeds that level. © 1998 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Blackwell in its journal Agricultural Economics.

Volume (Year): 19 (1998)
Issue (Month): 1-2 (September)
Pages: 27-32

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Handle: RePEc:eee:agecon:v:19:y:1998:i:1-2:p:27-32

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Web page: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/loi/agec

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Cited by:
  1. Masters, William A. & McMillan, Margaret S., 2001. "Climate And Scale In Economic Growth," Miscellaneous Papers 11845, Agecon Search.
  2. Dalton, Timothy J. & Masters, William A., 1997. "Soil Degradation, Technical Change And Government Policies In Southern Mali," 1997 Annual meeting, July 27-30, Toronto, Canada 21033, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).

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