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Educational Performance as Signalling Device: Evidence from Italy

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  • Luisa Rosti

    ()
    (University of Pavia)

  • Chikara Yamaguchi

    ()
    (Sapporo Gakuin University)

  • Carolina Castagnetti

    ()
    (University of Pavia)

Abstract

Following Brown and Sessions (1999) we apply the comparative techniques originated by Wolpin (1977) and Psacharopoulos (1979) to discriminate between the weak and strong screening hypotheses. Our data provides additional empirical results for the Italian labour market shifting the focus of the relationship between education and wages from the highest level of education completed to more specific measurements like degree score and completion speed. Our results show that the strong screening hypothesis is strengthened, i. e. that educational performance has an insignificant return for the self-employed, but a significantly positive return for employees.

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File URL: http://www.accessecon.com/pubs/EB/2005/Volume9/EB-05I20006A.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by AccessEcon in its journal Economics Bulletin.

Volume (Year): 9 (2005)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 1-7

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Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-05i20006

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References

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  1. Stacy Berg Dale & Alan B. Krueger, 1999. "Estimating the Payoff to Attending a More Selective College: An Application of Selection on Observables and Unobservables," NBER Working Papers 7322, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Spence, A Michael, 1973. "Job Market Signaling," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 87(3), pages 355-74, August.
  3. Stiglitz, Joseph E, 1975. "The Theory of "Screening," Education, and the Distribution of Income," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 65(3), pages 283-300, June.
  4. Garcia-Mainar, Inmaculada & Montuenga-Gomez, Victor M., 2005. "Education returns of wage earners and self-employed workers: Portugal vs. Spain," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 24(2), pages 161-170, April.
  5. Psacharopoulos, George, 1979. "On the weak versus the strong version of the screening hypothesis," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 4(2), pages 181-185.
  6. Norton Grubb, W., 1995. "Postsecondary education and the sub-baccalaureate labor market: Corrections and extensions," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 285-299, September.
  7. Rees, Hedley & Shah, Anup, 1986. "An Empirical Analysis of Self-employment in the U.K," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 1(1), pages 95-108, January.
  8. Alba-Ramirez, Alfonso & San Segundo, Maria Jesus, 1995. "The returns to education in Spain," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 155-166, June.
  9. Le, Anh T, 1999. " Empirical Studies of Self-Employment," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 13(4), pages 381-416, September.
  10. Fredland, J. Eric & Little, Roger D., 1981. "Self-employed workers: Returns to education and training," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 1(3), pages 315-337, June.
  11. Layard, Richard & Psacharopoulos, George, 1974. "The Screening Hypothesis and the Returns to Education," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(5), pages 985-98, Sept./Oct.
  12. Grubb, W. Norton, 1993. "Further tests of screening on education and observed ability," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 12(2), pages 125-136, June.
  13. Arrow, Kenneth J., 1973. "Higher education as a filter," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 2(3), pages 193-216, July.
  14. Jacob Mincer, 1958. "Investment in Human Capital and Personal Income Distribution," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 66, pages 281.
  15. Brown, Sarah & Sessions, John G, 1998. "Education, Employment Status and Earnings: A Comparative Test of the Strong Screening Hypothesis," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 45(5), pages 586-91, November.
  16. Kevin M. Murphy & Andrei Shleifer & Robert W. Vishny, 1990. "The Allocation of Talent: Implications for Growth," NBER Working Papers 3530, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  17. Eugene A. Kroch & Kriss Sjoblom, 1994. "Schooling as Human Capital or a Signal: Some Evidence," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 29(1), pages 156-180.
  18. Riley, John G, 1979. "Testing the Educational Screening Hypothesis," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(5), pages S227-52, October.
  19. Psacharopoulos, George, 1996. "Economics of education: A research agenda," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 339-344, October.
  20. Wolpin, Kenneth I, 1977. "Education and Screening," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 67(5), pages 949-58, December.
  21. John Heywood & Xiangdong Wei, 2004. "Education and Signaling: Evidence from a Highly Competitive Labor Market," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(1), pages 1-16.
  22. Tucker, Irvin III, 1985. "Use of the decomposition technique to test the educational screening hypothesis," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 4(4), pages 321-326, August.
  23. Brown, Sarah & Sessions, John G., 1999. "Education and employment status: a test of the strong screening hypothesis in Italy," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 397-404, October.
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Cited by:
  1. Stephan O. Hornig & Horst Rottmann & Rüdiger Wapler, 2009. "Information Asymmetry, Education Signals and the Case of Ethnic and Native Germans," CESifo Working Paper Series 2683, CESifo Group Munich.
  2. Chagas Lopes, MARGARIDA, 2012. "Education, Development and Knowledge: New Forms of Unequal Change Under Globalization. The Case of SSA Countries," MPRA Paper 55742, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Carolina Castagnetti & Luisa Rosti, 2010. "The Gender Gap in Academic Achievements of Italian Graduates," Quaderni di Dipartimento 118, University of Pavia, Department of Economics and Quantitative Methods.
  4. Carolina Castagnetti & Luisa Rosti, 2009. "Who skims the cream of the Italian graduate crop? Wage-employment versus self-employment," Quaderni di Dipartimento 089, University of Pavia, Department of Economics and Quantitative Methods.
  5. Carolina Castagnetti & Silvia Dal Bianco & Luisa Rosti, 2011. "Shortening university career fades the signal away. Evidence from Italy," Quaderni di Dipartimento 146, University of Pavia, Department of Economics and Quantitative Methods.

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