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Shortening university career fades the signal away. Evidence from Italy

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  • Carolina Castagnetti

    ()
    (Department of Economics and Quantitative Methods, University of Pavia)

  • Silvia Dal Bianco

    ()
    (Department of Economics and Quantitative Methods, University of Pavia)

  • Luisa Rosti

    ()
    (Department of Economics and Quantitative Methods, University of Pavia)

Abstract

Italian university system was reformed in 2001. This paper tests the screening role of degree scores for 2004-Italian graduates. We find support of the strong screening hypothesis for prereform type degrees, while we do not find any evidence of signalling effects for post-reform 3-years degrees. We gauge that the shutting down of the signal can be partially ascribed to the poor quality of students who obtained a 3-years degree without taking any further education.

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File URL: http://economia.unipv.it/docs/dipeco/quad/ps/RePEc/pav/wpaper/q146.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Pavia, Department of Economics and Quantitative Methods in its series Quaderni di Dipartimento with number 146.

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Length: 9 pages
Date of creation: May 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:pav:wpaper:146

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Keywords: Screening; Italy; Higher Education;

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  1. Arnaud Chevalier & Colm Harmon & Ian Walker & Yu Zhu, 2003. "Does education raise productivity, or just reflect it?," Working Papers 200304, School Of Economics, University College Dublin.
  2. Thomas O. BRODATY & Robert J. GARY-BOBO & Ana PRIETO, 2009. "Does Speed Signal Ability , A Test of Spence's Theory," Working Papers 2009-02, Centre de Recherche en Economie et Statistique.
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  4. G. Boero & T. Laureti & R. Naylor, 2005. "An econometric analysis of student withdrawal and progression in post-reform Italian Universities," Working Paper CRENoS 200504, Centre for North South Economic Research, University of Cagliari and Sassari, Sardinia.
  5. Brown, Sarah & Sessions, John G, 1998. "Education, Employment Status and Earnings: A Comparative Test of the Strong Screening Hypothesis," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 45(5), pages 586-91, November.
  6. Bosio, Giulio & Leonardi, Marco, 2011. "The Impact of Bologna Process on the Graduate Labour Market: Demand and Supply," IZA Discussion Papers 5789, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Joseph G. Altonji & Charles R. Pierret, . "Employer Learning and Statistical Discrimination," IPR working papers 97-18, Institute for Policy Resarch at Northwestern University.
  8. Arnaud Chevalier, 2003. "Measuring Over-education," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 70(279), pages 509-531, 08.
  9. Cappellari, Lorenzo & Lucifora, Claudio, 2008. "The "Bologna Process" and College Enrolment Decisions," IZA Discussion Papers 3444, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  10. John Heywood & Xiangdong Wei, 2004. "Education and Signaling: Evidence from a Highly Competitive Labor Market," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(1), pages 1-16.
  11. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:9:y:2005:i:4:p:1-7 is not listed on IDEAS
  12. repec:rie:review:v:15:y:2010:i:2:n:4 is not listed on IDEAS
  13. Giorgio Di Pietro & Andrea Cutillo, 2006. "University Quality and Labour Market Outcomes in Italy," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 20(1), pages 37-62, 03.
  14. Fabian Lange, 2007. "The Speed of Employer Learning," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 25, pages 1-35.
  15. Brown, Sarah & Sessions, John G., 1999. "Education and employment status: a test of the strong screening hypothesis in Italy," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 397-404, October.
  16. Luisa Rosti & Chikara Yamaguchi & Carolina Castagnetti, 2005. "Educational Performance as Signalling Device: Evidence from Italy," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 9(4), pages 1-7.
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