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Innis Lecture: Universal early childhood interventions: what is the evidence base?

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  • Michael Baker

Abstract

Universality is a hallmark of Canadian social policy for very young children. The evidence base for these policies is small, non-experimental, and offers mixed results. In contrast, the evidence base for targeted early childhood interventions is largely experimental and offers strong guidance. Policy makers and advocates often cite the research on targeted programs in support of universal programs, although this is problematic for a number of reasons. Universal programs require a better understanding of the developmental trajectories of more advantaged children. Evidence from the NLSCY suggests there are some potentially important differences in the association of early and later childhood developmental outcomes by family economic resources.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Canadian Economics Association in its journal Canadian Journal of Economics.

Volume (Year): 44 (2011)
Issue (Month): 4 (November)
Pages: 1069-1105

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Handle: RePEc:cje:issued:v:44:y:2011:i:4:p:1069-1105

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Cited by:
  1. Havnes, Tarjei & Mogstad, Magne, 2012. "Is Universal Child Care Leveling the Playing Field?," Memorandum 31/2012, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
  2. Kottelenberg, Michael J. & Lehrer, Steven F., 2014. "Do the Perils of Universal Child Care Depend on the Child's Age?," CLSSRN working papers clsrn_admin-2014-14, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 26 Mar 2014.
  3. Drange, Nina & Havnes, Tarjei & Sandsør, Astrid M. J., 2012. "Kindergarten for All: Long Run Effects of a Universal Intervention," IZA Discussion Papers 6986, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Nicholas-James Clavet & Jean-Yves Duclos, 2012. "Le financement des services de garde des enfants: effets sur le travail, le revenu des familles, et les finances publiques," Cahiers de recherche 1216, CIRPEE.
  5. Yusuf Emre Akgunduz & Egbert Jongen & Paul Leseman & Janneke Plantenga, 2013. "Cutting from the future? Impact of a subsidy reduction on child care quality in the Netherlands," Working Papers 13-18, Utrecht School of Economics.
  6. Wim Van Lancker, 2013. "Putting the child-centred investment strategy to the test: Evidence for the EU27," Working Papers 1301, Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp.

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