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Family income, parenting styles and child behavioural-emotional outcomes

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Author Info

  • Martin Dooley

    (Department of Economics, McMaster University, Canada)

  • Jennifer Stewart

    (School of Public Policy and Administration, Carleton University, Canada)

Abstract

A positive relationship between income and child outcomes has been observed in data from numerous countries. A key question concerns the extent to which this association represents a causal relationship as opposed to unobserved heterogeneity. We use data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth to implement a series of empirical strategies for estimating the existence and size of the effect of income on behavioural-emotional outcomes. We also examine the role of parenting style. Our results indicate that there is little evidence of an effect of income on behavioural-emotional scores. The exclusion of parenting style from the models was found to not bias the estimated income effect, but parenting style was found to have a consistent impact on child outcomes. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/hec.1142
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Health Economics.

Volume (Year): 16 (2007)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 145-162

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Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:16:y:2007:i:2:p:145-162

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Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5749

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References

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  1. Pierre Merrigan & Philip Lefebvre, 2002. "The Effect of Childcare and Early Education Arrangements on Developmental Outcomes of Young Children," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 28(2), pages 159-185, June.
  2. Patricia M. Anderson & Kristin F. Butcher & Phillip B. Levine, 2002. "Maternal Employment and Overweight Children," NBER Working Papers 8770, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Martin Dooley & Ellen Lipman & Jennifer Stewart, 2005. "Exploring the Good Mother Hypothesis: Do Child Outcomes Vary with the Mother's Share of Income?," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 31(2), pages 123-144, June.
  4. Rhonda Kornberger & Janet E. Fast & Deanna L. Williamson, 2001. "Welfare or Work: Which is Better for Canadian Children?," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 27(4), pages 407-421, December.
  5. Phipps , Shelley & Burton, Peter & Curtis, Lori, 2005. "All in the Family: A Simultaneous Model of Parenting Style and Child Conduct," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2005261e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
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Cited by:
  1. Jason Fletcher & Barbara L. Wolfe, 2012. "Increasing Our Understanding of the Health-Income Gradient in Children," NBER Working Papers 18639, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Currie, Janet & Stabile, Mark, 2006. "Child mental health and human capital accumulation: The case of ADHD," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(6), pages 1094-1118, November.
  3. Michael Keane & Mario Fiorini, 2012. "How the Allocation of Children's Time Affects Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Development," Economics Series Working Papers 2012-W09, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  4. Donal O’Neill & Sinéad McGilloway & Michael Donnelly & Tracey Bywater & Paul Kelly, 2013. "A cost-effectiveness analysis of the Incredible Years parenting programme in reducing childhood health inequalities," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer, vol. 14(1), pages 85-94, February.
  5. Janet Currie & Mark Stabile, 2007. "Mental Health in Childhood and Human Capital," NBER Chapters, in: The Problems of Disadvantaged Youth: An Economic Perspective, pages 115-148 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Lynda G. Gagné & Ana Ferrer, 2006. "Housing, Neighbourhoods and Development Outcomes of Children in Canada," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 32(3), pages 275-300, September.
  7. Costa-Font, Joan & Gil, Joan, 2013. "Intergenerational and socioeconomic gradients of child obesity," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 29-37.
  8. Benjamín Villena-Rodán & Cecilia Ríos-Aguilar, 2011. "Causal Effects of Maternal Time-Investment on Children's Cognitive Outcomes," Documentos de Trabajo 285, Centro de Economía Aplicada, Universidad de Chile.

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