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Can't Buy Mommy's Love? Universal Childcare and Children's Long-Term Cognitive Development

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  • Christina Felfe
  • Natalia Nollenberger
  • Núria Rodríguez-Planas

Abstract

What happens to children’s long-run cognitive development when introducing universal high-quality childcare for 3-year olds mainly crowds out maternal care? To answer this question we exploit a natural experiment framework and employ a difference-in-difference approach. We find sizable improvements in children’s reading and math skills at age 15, as well as in grade progression during primary and secondary school. Effects are driven by girls and disadvantaged children.

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File URL: http://www.cesifo-group.de/portal/page/portal/DocBase_Content/WP/WP-CESifo_Working_Papers/wp-cesifo-2013/wp-cesifo-2013-01/cesifo1_wp4069.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by CESifo Group Munich in its series CESifo Working Paper Series with number 4069.

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Date of creation: 2013
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Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_4069

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Keywords: universal high-quality childcare; long-term consequences; cognitive skills;

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References

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  1. Elizabeth U. Cascio, 2009. "Do Investments in Universal Early Education Pay Off? Long-term Effects of Introducing Kindergartens into Public Schools," NBER Working Papers 14951, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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Cited by:
  1. Florentino Felgueroso & Maria Gutiérrez-Domènech & Sergi Jiménez-Martín, 2014. "Dropout trends and educational reforms: the role of the LOGSE in Spain," IZA Journal of Labor Policy, Springer, vol. 3(1), pages 1-24, December.
  2. Christina Felfe & Rafael Lalive, 2012. "Early Child Care and Child Development: For Whom it Works and Why," CESifo Working Paper Series 4043, CESifo Group Munich.
  3. Felfe, Christina & Zierow, Larissa, 2013. "After-School Center-based Care and Children's Development," Economics Working Paper Series 1338, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science.
  4. Ylenia Brilli & Daniela Del Boca & Chiara Monfardini, 2013. "Child Care Arrangements: Determinants and Consequences," CHILD Working Papers Series, Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic Economics (CHILD) - CCA 18, Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic Economics (CHILD) - CCA.
  5. Kottelenberg, Michael J. & Lehrer, Steven F., 2014. "Do the Perils of Universal Child Care Depend on the Child's Age?," CLSSRN working papers clsrn_admin-2014-14, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 26 Mar 2014.

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