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Schooling and Citizenship in a Young Democracy: Evidence from Postwar Germany

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  • Thomas Siedler

Abstract

This paper examines whether schooling has a causal impact on individuals' political behavior. Between 1949 and 1969, the number of compulsory years of schooling in the Federal Republic of Germany was gradually increased across all federal states. These legislative changes provide an opportunity to investigate the causal impact of schooling on political behavior. Years of schooling are found to be positively correlated with several political outcomes. However, there is little evidence of a causal effect. This study conjectures that there is ample historical evidence to support the hypothesis that the fundamentals of democracy were already learned earlier in school, potentially outweighing the political returns of schooling in Germany. Copyright © The editors of the "Scandinavian Journal of Economics" 2010 .

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Wiley Blackwell in its journal Scandinavian Journal of Economics.

Volume (Year): 112 (2010)
Issue (Month): 2 (06)
Pages: 315-338

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Handle: RePEc:bla:scandj:v:112:y:2010:i:2:p:315-338

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Web page: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1467-9442

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Cited by:
  1. Akbulut-Yuksel, Mevlude & Yuksel, Mutlu, 2011. "The Long-Term Direct and External Effects of Jewish Expulsions in Nazi Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 5850, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Arnaud Chevalier & Orla Doyle, 2012. "Schooling and Voter Turnout - Is there an American Exception?," Working Papers 201213, School Of Economics, University College Dublin.
  3. Ingo Geishecker & Thomas Siedler, 2012. "Job Loss Fears and (Extremist) Party Identification: First Evidence from Panel Data," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 511, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  4. Marc Piopiunik, 2011. "Microeconometric Analyses of Education Production in Germany," ifo Beiträge zur Wirtschaftsforschung, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 40.
  5. Marc Piopiunik, 2011. "Intergenerational Transmission of Education and Mediating Channels: Evidence from Compulsory Schooling Reforms in Germany," Ifo Working Paper Series Ifo Working Paper No. 107, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
  6. Panu Pelkonen, 2012. "Length of compulsory education and voter turnout—evidence from a staged reform," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 150(1), pages 51-75, January.
  7. Thomas Siedler & Bettina Sonnenberg, 2012. "Intergenerational Earnings Mobility and Preferences for Redistribution," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 510, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  8. Saniter, Nils, 2012. "Estimating Heterogeneous Returns to Education in Germany via Conditional Second Moments," Annual Conference 2012 (Goettingen): New Approaches and Challenges for the Labor Market of the 21st Century 62050, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  9. Nils Saniter, 2012. "Estimating Heterogeneous Returns to Education in Germany via Conditional Heteroskedasticity," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 458, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  10. Kamila Cygan-Rehm & Miriam Maeder, 2012. "The Effect of Education on Fertility: Evidence from a Compulsory Schooling Reform," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 528, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  11. Geishecker, Ingo & Siedler, Thomas, 2011. "Job loss fears and (extreme) party identification: First evidence from panel data," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 129, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
  12. Cygan-Rehm, Kamila & Mäder, Miriam, 2012. "The Effect of Education on Fertility: Evidence from a Compulsory Schooling Reform," Annual Conference 2012 (Goettingen): New Approaches and Challenges for the Labor Market of the 21st Century 62037, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

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