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Private, National, and International Food-Safety Standards

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Author Info

  • Buzby, Jean C.
  • Mitchell, Lorraine

Abstract

Just as international food and agricultural trade has increased over time, food safety has become increasingly important. This paper discusses the economic framework of food safety and international food trade. Both the private and public sectors within individual countries have incentives to improve food safety, and as a result they have taken many actions to reduce food-safety risks, often in the form of private, national, and international standards that they impose of firms. The first half of this article discusses these issues. Differences in standards across borders can lead to trade conflicts whose resolutions depend on the distribution of costs and benefits from the manufacture, trade, and consumption of safe food. The second half of this article presents a framework of three main types of international outcomes arising from differing food-safety standards, with examples from both the public and private sectors.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/8563
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Food Distribution Research Society in its journal Journal of Food Distribution Research.

Volume (Year): 37 (2006)
Issue (Month): 01 (March)
Pages:

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Handle: RePEc:ags:jlofdr:8563

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Web page: http://fdrs.ag.utk.edu/
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Related research

Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety;

References

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  1. Golan, Elise H. & Kuchler, Fred & Mitchell, Lorraine, 2000. "Economics Of Food Labeling," Agricultural Economics Reports 34069, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  2. Mitchell, Lorraine, 2004. "Food Safety and International Trade: Theoretical Issues," Agricultural Information Bulletins 33599, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  3. Frenzen, Paul D. & Buzby, Jean C. & Rasco, Barbara, 2001. "Product Liability And Microbial Foodborne Illness," Agricultural Economics Reports 34059, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  4. Buzby, Jean C. & Roberts, Tanya & Lin, Chung-Tung Jordan & MacDonald, James M., 1996. "Bacterial Foodborne Disease: Medical Costs and Productivity Losses," Agricultural Economics Reports 33991, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  5. Hooker, Neal H., 1999. "Food safety regulation and trade in food products," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 24(6), pages 653-668, December.
  6. Segerson, Kathleen, 1998. "Mandatory vs. Voluntary Approaches to Food Safety," Research Reports 25188, University of Connecticut, Food Marketing Policy Center.
  7. Buzby, Jean C. & Unnevehr, Laurian J., 2004. "Food Safety and International Trade," Agricultural Information Bulletins 33629, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  8. Winnie Mitullah, 2000. "Food Safety Requirements and Food Exports from Developing Countries: The Case of Fish Exports from Kenya to the European Union," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 82(5), pages 1159-1169.
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