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Trade, Doha, and Development : A Window into the Issues

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  • Richard Newfarmer
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    Abstract

    This book traces the development of world trade from the era when the global trading system had been stacked against growth in developing countries to the present time when the membership of the WTO has grown to include most developing countries. It is for this reason that the Doha Round is important: It has given all countries of the world the opportunity to work collectively on barriers of interest to developing countries and to the world's poor. Although the choice is simple, it is not easy. The underlying details of the issues are notoriously complex. Observers have a difficult time penetrating the veil of legal and economic opacity that envelops the negotiations. The details are sufficiently technical and multifarious that experts in one area are often unaware of technical details in another. And details make the difference between opening markets and merely appearing to do so through a vacuous agreement that looks good on the surface but does little or nothing to widen opportunities for poor traders in the global market place. This book provides succinct analyses of the most critical issues facing negotiators, highlighting the choices that most affect development. It is a window into the issues. The WTO negotiations are not the only ones shaping the world trading system. For one thing, regional trade agreements in growing numbers are introducing preferential trade arrangements between subsets of the international community. Then again, a third subject of international policy discussions-"aid for trade"-affects developing countries' opportunities to participate in the global market. This book details the pitfalls for the world economic system to avoid, and the author hopes that it will contribute to a better world trading system, one that is more equitable and more supportive of development.

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    File URL: https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/bitstream/handle/10986/7135/396500PAPER0Tr10082136437501PUBLIC1.pdf?sequence=1
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    Bibliographic Info

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    This book is provided by The World Bank in its series World Bank Publications with number 7135 and published in 2006.

    ISBN: 978-0-8213-6437-6
    Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:7135

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    Web page: https://openknowledge.worldbank.org
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    Related research

    Keywords: Law and Development - Trade Law International Economics and Trade - Trade and Regional Integration International Economics and Trade - Trade Policy International Economics and Trade - Free Trade Economic Theory and Research Macroeconomics and Economic Growth;

    References

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    1. Roberts, Donna & Orden, David, 1995. "Determinants of Technical Barriers to Trade: The Case of US Phytosanitary Restrictions on Mexican Avocados, 1972-1995," 1995: Understanding Technical Barriers to Agricultural Trade Conference, December 1995, Tucson, Arizona, International Agricultural Trade Research Consortium 50709, International Agricultural Trade Research Consortium.
    2. World Bank, 2005. "Food Safety and Agricultural Health Standards : Challenges and Opportunities for Developing Country Exports," World Bank Other Operational Studies, The World Bank 8491, The World Bank.
    3. Unnevehr, Laurian J., ed., 2003. "Food safety in food security and food trade:," 2020 vision focus, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) 10, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Anonymous, 2003. "International Trade And Food Safety: Economic Theory And Case Studies," Agricultural Economics Reports, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service 33941, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    5. Bureau, Jean-Christophe & Marette, Stephan & Schiavina, Alessandra, 1998. "Non-tariff Trade Barriers and Consumers' Information: The Case of the EU-US Trade Dispute over Beef," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 25(4), pages 437-62.
    6. Jaffee, Steven & Henson, Spencer, 2004. "Standards and agro-food exports from developing countries: rebalancing the debate," Policy Research Working Paper Series, The World Bank 3348, The World Bank.
    7. Timothy E. Josling & Donna Roberts & David Orden, 2004. "Food Regulation and Trade: Toward a Safe and Open Global System," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 347, July.
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    Cited by:
    1. World Bank, 2006. "World Development Indicators 2006," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, The World Bank, number 8151, August.
    2. Laura COLLINSON & Jaime de MELO, 2011. "Getting the best out of regional integration: Some thoughts for Rwanda," Working Papers, FERDI P27, FERDI.
    3. Hewitt, Joanna, 2008. "Impact evaluation of research by the International Food Policy Research Institute on agricultural trade liberalization, developing countries, and WTO's Doha negotiations:," Impact assessments, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) 28, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

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