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Market Demands For Bagged, Refrigerated Salads

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  • Thompson, Gary D.
  • Wilson, Paul N.

Abstract

Sales of newly introduced bagged, refrigerated salads grew at over 50% annually, during 1994-95. Consumption of bagged salads displayed marked seasonality despite year-round availability and uniform quality at more stable prices than head lettuce. Using scanner data from 44 areas, a single-equation demand model incorporating the effects of weather on seasonal consumption is estimated. Statistical tests of aggregation indicate that weather-induced seasonality varies significantly across areas, as do own- and cross- price elasticities. Econometric results suggest more seasonality in eating by people living in more northern latitudes, a pattern also observed by psychiatrists studying eating disorders.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Western Agricultural Economics Association in its journal Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics.

Volume (Year): 24 (1999)
Issue (Month): 02 (December)
Pages:

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Handle: RePEc:ags:jlaare:30801

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Web page: http://waeaonline.org/
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Related research

Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety;

References

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  1. LaFrance, Jeffrey T., 1985. "Linear demand functions in theory and practice," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 147-166, October.
  2. Oral Capps & Rodolfo M. Nayga, 1991. "Demand for fresh beef products in supermarkets: A trial with scanner data," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 7(3), pages 241-251.
  3. Hausmann, J. A. & Kinnucan, M. & McFaddden, D., 1979. "A two-level electricity demand model : Evaluation of the connecticut time-of-day pricing test," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 10(3), pages 263-289, August.
  4. Capps, Oral, Jr. & Seo, Seong-Cheon & Nichols, John P., 1997. "On The Estimation Of Advertising Effects For Branded Products: An Application To Spaghetti Sauces," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 29(02), December.
  5. M. H. Pesaran & R. G. Pierse & M. S. Kumar, 1988. "Econometric Analysis of Aggregation in the Context of Linear Prediction Models," UCLA Economics Working Papers 485, UCLA Department of Economics.
  6. Eastwood, David B., 1997. "Information Technology And Fresh Produce: A Case Study Using Store Level Scan Data To Analyze Sales," Working Papers 14339, University of Minnesota, The Food Industry Center.
  7. Timothy A. Park & Luanne Lohr, 1996. "Supply and Demand Factors for Organic Produce," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(3), pages 647-655.
  8. Guilkey, David K., 1974. "Alternative tests for a first-order vector autoregressive error specification," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 2(1), pages 95-104, May.
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Cited by:
  1. Lusk, Jayson L. & Marsh, Thomas L., 2000. "Wholesale Demand For Usda Quality Graded Boxed Beef And Effects Of Seasonality," 2000 Annual Meeting, June 29-July 1, 2000, Vancouver, British Columbia 36409, Western Agricultural Economics Association.
  2. Alan Kackmeister, 2005. "Yesterday's bad times are today's good old times: retail price changes in the 1890s were smaller, less frequent, and more permanent," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2005-18, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  3. Alan Kackmeister, 2007. "Yesterday's Bad Times Are Today's Good Old Times: Retail Price Changes Are More Frequent Today Than in the 1890s," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 39(8), pages 1987-2020, December.
  4. Handy, Charles R. & Thompson, Gary D. & Glaser, Lewrene K., 2001. "Recent Changes In Marketing And Trade Practices In The U.S. Lettuce And Fresh-Cut Vegetable Industries," Agricultural Information Bulletins 33601, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.

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