IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/zbw/cawmdp/13.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Does wage rigidity really exist? New evidence from US panel data

Author

Listed:
  • von Blanckenburg, Korbinian
  • Geist, Alexander
  • Schmidt, Jörg

Abstract

Downward nominal wage rigidity (DNWR) could prevent real wage adjustments in times of low inflation rates. Nominal wage rigidity based on annual wages can at least be reduced, if the number of working hours is considered. This leads to a lower degree of DNWR in hourly wage changes. In this paper, we use a histogram-location approach to investigate to what extent annual as well as hourly wages are subject to downward nominal wage rigidity. Using data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) we find that annual wage changes exhibit a substantially higher level of wage rigidity than hourly wage changes which also holds for males compared to females.

Suggested Citation

  • von Blanckenburg, Korbinian & Geist, Alexander & Schmidt, Jörg, 2009. "Does wage rigidity really exist? New evidence from US panel data," CAWM Discussion Papers 13, University of Münster, Center of Applied Economic Research Münster (CAWM).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:cawmdp:13
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/51273/1/671600737.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Christoph Knoppik & Thomas Beissinger, 2003. "How Rigid are Nominal Wages? Evidence and Implications for Germany," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 105(4), pages 619-641, December.
    2. Christoph Knoppik & Thomas Beissinger, 2009. "Downward nominal wage rigidity in Europe: an analysis of European micro data from the ECHP 1994–2001," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 36(2), pages 321-338, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Wage Rigidity; Histogram-Location Approach;

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • J30 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - General
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:zbw:cawmdp:13. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (ZBW - German National Library of Economics). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/camuede.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.