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International Trade and Monopolistic Competition without CES: Estimating Translog Gravity

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  • Novy, Dennis

    (Department of Economics, University of Warwick and CESifo)

Abstract

This paper derives a micro-founded gravity equation in general equilibrium based on a translog demand system that allows for endogenous markups and rich substitution patterns across goods. In contrast to standard CES-based gravity equations, trade is more sensitive to trade costs if the exporting country only provides a small share of the destination country?s imports. As a result, trade costs have a heterogeneous impact across country pairs, with some trade flows predicted to be zero. I test the translog gravity equation and find strong empirical support in its favor. In an application to the currency union effect, I find that a currency union is only associated with substantially higher bilateral trade if the exporting country provides a small share of the destination country's imports. For other pairs, the currency union effect is modest or indistinguishable from zero. I test the translog gravity equation and find strong empirical support in it's favour.

Suggested Citation

  • Novy, Dennis, 2010. "International Trade and Monopolistic Competition without CES: Estimating Translog Gravity," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 929, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:wrk:warwec:929
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    File URL: https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/economics/research/workingpapers/2010/twerp_929.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. James E. Anderson, 2011. "The Gravity Model," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 3(1), pages 133-160, September.
    2. Costas Arkolakis & Arnaud Costinot & Dave Donaldson & Andrés Rodríguez-Clare, 2015. "The Elusive Pro-Competitive Effects of Trade," NBER Working Papers 21370, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Murat Genç & David Law, 2014. "A Gravity Model of Barriers to Trade in New Zealand," Treasury Working Paper Series 14/05, New Zealand Treasury.
    4. CHRIS MILNER & DANNY McGOWAN, 2013. "Trade Costs And Trade Composition," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 51(3), pages 1886-1902, July.
    5. Oxana Babecká Kucharčuková & Jan Babecký & Martin Raiser, 2012. "Gravity Approach for Modelling International Trade in South-Eastern Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States: The Role of Geography, Policy and Institutions," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 23(2), pages 277-301, April.
    6. Herwartz, Helmut & Weber, Henning, 2013. "The role of cross-sectional heterogeneity for magnitude and timing of the euro's trade effect," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 48-74.
    7. Oxana Babecka Kucharcukova & Jan Babecky & Martin Raiser, 2010. "A Gravity Approach to Modelling International Trade in South-Eastern Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States: The Role of Geography, Policy and Institutions," Working Papers 2010/04, Czech National Bank, Research Department.
    8. Lucie Davidova & Vladimir Benacek, 2014. "Determinants of Austrian International Trade: Analysis Based on the Gravity Model," Working Papers IES 2014/15, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, revised Feb 2014.
    9. Beatriz de Blas & Katheryn N. Russ, 2010. "Teams of rivals: endogenous markups in a Ricardian world," Globalization and Monetary Policy Institute Working Paper 67, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
    10. Beatriz de Blas & Katheryn N. Russ, 2015. "Understanding Markups in the Open Economy," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(2), pages 157-180, April.
    11. Beatriz de Blas & Katheryn Russ, 2010. "Understanding Markups in the Open Economy under Bertrand Competition," NBER Working Papers 16587, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Translog ; Gravity ; Trade Costs; Distance; Trade Cost Elasticy JEL Codes: F11 ; F12 ; F15;

    JEL classification:

    • F11 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Neoclassical Models of Trade
    • F12 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Models of Trade with Imperfect Competition and Scale Economies; Fragmentation
    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration

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