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Who Decides on Public Expenditures? A Political Economy Analysis of the Budget Process: The Case of Argentina

Author

Listed:
  • Emmanuel Abuelafia

    (CIPPEC)

  • Sergio Berensztein

    (Universidad Torcuato di Tella)

  • Miguel Braun

    (CIPPEC)

  • Luciano di Gresia

    (Universidad Nacional de La Plata)

Abstract

The budget process is increasingly considered key for reform efforts to improve fiscal outcomes. In this paper we embark on a political economy analysis of the budget process in Argentina, in the spirit of the IDB project “Political Institutions, Policymaking Processes and Policy Outcomes” in order to understand who determines budget outcomes in Argentina. In particular, we seek to characterize the institutional framework that regulates the budget preparation, approval, implementation and control. Furthermore, we identify which actors are involved both formally and informally in the process at each stage, and seek to understand their incentives and interactions. We find that the President has a de facto role that is much more powerful than what the laws and institutions of the budget process stipulate. However, the rigidity of the budget process, together with other constraints such as macroeconomic shocks, fiscal rules, agreements with International Financial Institutions (IFIs) and the influence of other actors such as governors, legislators and lobbies - have limited the ability of the Executive to substantially modify the budget process. Furthermore, compared with the period of high inflation of 1983-1991, in the past decade we have witnessed dramatic improvements in the institutionalization of the budget process, both in political and administrative terms. These reforms have accompanied a strong improvement in fiscal outcomes in the 1990s compared with the 1980s, and provided some of the tools necessary to limit the depth of the recent crisis and regain macroeconomic stability.

Suggested Citation

  • Emmanuel Abuelafia & Sergio Berensztein & Miguel Braun & Luciano di Gresia, 2005. "Who Decides on Public Expenditures? A Political Economy Analysis of the Budget Process: The Case of Argentina," Public Economics 0511004, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwppe:0511004
    Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 65
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. La mentira como política de Estado
      by Lindahl in Finanzas Públicas on 2008-08-03 19:42:00

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    Cited by:

    1. Ruiz del Castillo, Ramiro & Cetrángolo, Oscar & Jiménez, Juan Pablo, 2010. "Rigidities and fiscal space in Latin America: a comparative case study," Macroeconomía del Desarrollo 97, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL).
    2. Heidi Jane M. Smith, 2013. "Explaining Borrowing Patterns of Mexican Cities: The Case of the State of Guanajuato," Economic Alternatives, University of National and World Economy, Sofia, Bulgaria, issue 2, pages 75-87, April.
    3. José Bercoff & Osvaldo Meloni, 2009. "Federal budget allocation in an emergent democracy: evidence from Argentina," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 10(1), pages 65-83, January.
    4. Ricardo N. Bebczuk, 2008. "Un modelo de consistencia macroeconómica para Costa Rica," Research Department Publications 2015, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D6 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics
    • D7 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making
    • H - Public Economics

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