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Enhancing the Quality of Data on Income: Recent Developments in Survey Methodology

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  • Michael Hurd

    (RAND Corporation)

  • F. Thomas Juster

    (University of Michigan)

  • James P. Smith

    (RAND Corporation)

Abstract

In this paper, we evaluate two survey innovations aimed at improving income measurement. These innovations are (1) integrating the question sequences for income and wealth which may elicit more accurate estimates of income from capital than has been true in the past, and (2) changes in the periodicity over which income flows are measured, which may provide a closer match between what the survey respondent knows best and the periodicity contained in survey measurement. These innovations have been introduced into both the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) and the study of Asset and Health Dynamics Among the Oldest Old (AHEAD). Based on the results reported in this paper, the potential return in quality of income measurement from these innovations is substantial.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael Hurd & F. Thomas Juster & James P. Smith, 2004. "Enhancing the Quality of Data on Income: Recent Developments in Survey Methodology," Labor and Demography 0412001, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpla:0412001
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    File URL: https://econwpa.ub.uni-muenchen.de/econ-wp/lab/papers/0412/0412001.pdf
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    as
    1. F. Thomas Juster & James P. Smith, 2004. "Improving the Quality of Economic Data: Lessons from the HRS and AHEAD," Labor and Demography 0402010, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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    Cited by:

    1. Miguel Székely & Marianne Hilgert, 1999. "Los años 90 en América Latina: otra década de pertinaz desigualdad," Research Department Publications 4191, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    2. Miguel Szekely & Nora Lustig & Martin Cumpa & Jose Antonio Mejia, 2004. "Do we know how much poverty there is?," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(4), pages 523-558.
    3. Arie Kapteyn & Jelmer Y. Ypma, 2007. "Measurement Error and Misclassification: A Comparison of Survey and Administrative Data," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 25, pages 513-551.
    4. Miguel Székely & Marianne Hilgert, 1999. "What's Behind the Inequality we Measure: An Investigation Using Latin American Data," Research Department Publications 4188, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    5. Miguel Székely & Marianne Hilgert, 1999. "The 1990s in Latin America: Another Decade of Persistent Inequality," Research Department Publications 4190, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    6. Miguel Székely & Marianne Hilgert, 1999. "¿Qué hay detrás de la desigualdad cuantificada: investigación empleando datos de América Latina," Research Department Publications 4189, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    7. Miguel Székely & Nora Lustig & Martin Cumpa & José Antonio Mejía-Guerra, 2000. "¿Sabemos qué tanta pobreza hay?," Research Department Publications 4240, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.

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